WATCH: Unity & Politics In 2017, The CPS Overload Issue, & The ROC-NASA Connection

WATCH: Unity & Politics In 2017, The CPS Overload Issue, & The ROC-NASA Connection


COMING UP ON NEED TO KNOW…BEFORE THE INAUGURATION
OF DONALD TRUMP AS THE 45TH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, LOCAL POLITICAL LEADERS SHARE
WHAT OUR COUNTRY AND OUR REGION MUST DO TO MOVE FORWARD IN 2017. ALSO ON THE SHOW – THEY’RE THE YOUNG, THE
INNOCENT, AND THE VULNERABLE. AND THERE’S AN ENDLESS STRUGGLE TO KEEP
THE PROGRAMS INTENDED TO HELP THEM, FUNDED. WE’LL EXAMINE WHAT’S HAPPENING WITH CHILD
PROTECTIVE SERVICES IN OUR REGION AND WHAT NEEDS TO CHANGE TO KEEP YOUNG PEOPLE SAFE. AND A GROUP OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ARE GIVING
A NEW MEANING TO THE WELL-KNOWN PHRASE: “OUT OF THIS WORLD.” FROM ROCHESTER TO NASA – ALL THE DETAILS ON
THAT STORY JUST AHEAD. STAY WITH US, “NEED TO KNOW” STARTS NOW. ((RECORDED NEW 2017 OPEN)) TO DESCRIBE 2016 AS A POLITICAL ROLLER COASTER
RIDE IS AN UNDERSTATEMENT. WE SPENT QUITE A BIT OF TIME ON “NEED TO
KNOW” DISSECTING THE ISSUES AND THE IMPACT OF LAST YEAR’S POLITICAL CLIMATE. NOW THAT IT’S A NEW YEAR AND A TIME FOR
REFLECTION WHILE MAKING PLANS FOR THE WEEKS AND MONTHS AHEAD – I WANTED TO TAKE A LOOK
AT OUR LOCAL POLITICAL ENVIRONMENT. NATIONAL LEADERS FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE AISLE
HAVE CALLED FOR “UNITY” OVER THE PAST SEVERAL WEEKS – BUT WHAT DOES THAT MEAN AND
HOW DOES THAT APPLY TO OUR REGION? I THOUGHT THE BEST GUESTS FOR THIS CONVERSATION
WOULD BE THE CHAIRS OF TWO LOCAL POLITICAL PARTIES. JOINING ME AT THE TABLE IS JAMIE ROMEO – CHAIRWOMAN
OF THE MONROE COUNTY DEMOCRATIC COMMITTEE. BILL REILICH – CHAIRMAN OF THE MONROE COUNTY
REPUBLICAN COMMITTEE WAS UNABLE TO JOIN US FOR TODAY’S CONVERSATION – BUT I SPOKE WITH
BILL EARLIER THIS WEEK AND WE’LL SHARE PORTIONS OF THAT INTERVIEW. JAMIE, WELCOME… (Jamie Romeo) Thank you for having me. (Helene) So Jamie there are some that believe
that 2016 was this year that revealed a shameful truth about our nation, they said these united
states may not be so united after all, and they say that politics, and the presidential
election in particular, was really the catalyst to this division. So I posed this question to Bill Reilich,
but to you first, as you reflect back on the past year, would you agree with that sentiment
of division, or do you look back on it in a totally different way? (Romeo) I think that the past cycle did not
necessarily bring out the worst in us but it revealed some big problems, and there are
a lot of miscommunications and a lot of hard feelings; a number of people in this country
have been struggling. And that’s been very clear. It’s been very clear that a lot of people
feel that their governments or their political systems have not been working for them, and
it was unfortunately advantageous for some politically to see those divisions and to
further drive us apart because they knew it could be politically expedient. But I think what it really realizes is now,
more than ever, we really need to find ways to bring people back together because everyone
is struggling in their own different ways, but the only way we’re going to be able
to come up with solutions is not by taking the reins and governing to our base, but by
finding ways to come to the table and start creating some compromises. (Helene) Well Bill Reilich, Chairman of the
Rochester GOP, he had this to say in response to that question. (Bill Reilich) I think that the division that
was exposed in 2016 was building over several years. I think that many people…. I think to a large degree a lot of the comments
of our current president, President Obama, a lot of people didn’t agree with his position
or his thought process on several issues, and felt he should have been more aggressive
toward ISIS and identifying the terrorist acts for what they were, many people felt
he was reluctant to do so. Now, I’m just telling you the perspective
of the people who for so many years felt that their point of view was not being expressed. I think that 2016 gave them the opportunity
to say, OK, we’ve been quiet, we’ve been listening to our president, we don’t always
agree with him, and now is our chance to go in a different direction. (Helene) Jamie what are your thoughts in terms
of that? (Romeo) I think that that is a fair statement,
but I think it also shows a very different style of governing that we’re seeing between
our current president and the president-elect. Last night at one in the morning, or this
morning I should say, the Republican leadership that acts on the wishes of the president-elect
voted on significant steps to repeal the Affordable Care Act. And a lot of that is happening without public
conversation, without engaging the community about what people need, and there’s a lot
of fear right now, a lot of fear. Whereas people may have disagreed with the
President, he was putting forth proposals and having discussions with the nation and
that’s what we need from our president-elect going forward. (Helene) You mentioned also, in terms of going
forward, this idea of coming together, both sides of the aisle working together, that’s
something we’ve heard from national leaders, this call for unity, and Bill Reilich posed
an interesting question, we’ll hear from him right now, in regards to that earlier
this week. This call for unity. (Reilich) Well understand something. The thing that really annoys me, quite honestly,
is that I didn’t hear that for eight years. When the President would sign executive orders
instead of going to Congress and working it out, working through the issues. Now that’s turning out to probably being
a big mistake of his, because now, when he signed it with a pen and didn’t go to Congress,
it can be easily undone with a pen. Now he’s quite concerned about that. But why didn’t I hear about unity, why didn’t
I hear about working across the aisle for eight years as the President was signing executive
order after executive order instead of going to Congress and negotiating like every other
President in my lifetime has done. (Helene) Jamie you touched upon this just
a bit before we saw the video, how would you respond, and then how do you see your part
in terms of this call for unity locally as the Chair of the Democratic Party? (Romeo) Well I think that there’s difference
of opinions on the governing style of our current President Barack Obama, there were
some executive orders that he did but there are also very big compromises like the Affordable
Care Act that he presented that Congress had to work through to get to where we are today
where you have about 20 million more Americans that have health insurance including myself
as a result of that. I think as a community, but also larger as
a nation, what we need to do to go forward is, both sides have to make some concessions
about what happened in the past cycle. Democrats have to recognize that not all supporters
who voted for Donald Trump believe heart in heart every statement that he’s made and
his very controversial positions, and the Republicans have to recognize that there is
a very big disparity between the electoral victory and the electoral college, and the
popular vote. There isn’t necessarily this overwhelming
mandate for the president-elect and his agenda, but there is the need to make sure we are
bringing things to the table to have conversations in the nation. While the electoral college was obviously
very much for the president-elect, it’s very clear that we’re at a crossroads because
it did not reflect the real will of the voters that time. (Helene) I want to localize this just a little
bit, so when we look at the political climate in Monroe County, let’s look at the Monroe
County Legislature in particular, which has maintained its Republican majority, are there
instances that you can point to, for those watching, those who might say let’s get
to the point where we can synch and work together as you’ve discussed, are there instances
you can point to and say “you know what, we were able to achieve bipartisan solutions
to benefit our constituents”? (Romeo) Having been a staffer in the county
legislature for some time, I wish I could give you more examples of that, I think even
just recently with the latest budget that happened at the past forum with County Executive
Cheryl Dinolfo, the fact that amendments were taken to cut funding from the County Clerk’s
proposal about putting a downtown DMV office in, and then it went toward a child care program
that we don’t have a full understanding of, are we actually expanding the program,
are we trying to provide more services to people? Again, the need for having that conversation,
and the conversation with the constituents and the voters isn’t happening, and I think
that the county legislature should certainly be an area where we’re trying to better
have those conversations, not putting forward last minute amendments on the floor where
people don’t understand what we’re voting on. (Helene) Well as you may suspect, the Chairman
of the GOP, Bill Reilich, had a different thought on that, and he said collaboration
happens more often than not. And we’ll take a look at what he had to
say. (Reilich) I’m going to be honest with you. Probably, and I don’t know the exact number
but I would venture a guess, that 95, if not higher, 95% of all the referrals that are
introduced in the Monroe County legislature is unanimously supported. So the misnomer that they don’t work together
on anything… 95% of their work, if not more, is voted,
and both sides unanimously support. It’s only the one or two or three things
throughout the year that that doesn’t occur on that draws attention, and that is probably
because it doesn’t happen that often. (Helene) So Jamie he said one or two or three
things that both sides don’t agree on will probably take place each year, you’re coming
from a different standpoint though. (Romeo) Yes, and I would say that his percentage
is actually probably higher, because the majority of the business that the county legislature
does is procedural, it’s accepting money from the state, putting more money into a
program, but when it comes to policy decisions about a new program, or expanding a program,
or cutting a program, those are much fewer decisions that are made, and those are the
times where when you’re looking at what is the position that county government is
going to do, in one direction or another, that we constantly have these differences,
mostly because conversations aren’t really happening between the caucuses prior to going
to the floor, and that is a big concern. (Helene) Got it. Well the economy, healthcare needs, education,
the treatment of racial and ethnic minorities, these were all some of the top voting issues
according to people in 2016, I want to ask you, based on your position, how do they rank
locally for you? And when you look at the year ahead, what
can we expect to see in relation to some of these issues in Monroe County. (Romeo) I think that obviously jobs and taxes
and especially ethics and ethics reform right now in New York State have been the top issues
for a lot of voters when we were talking to people, and I think that it’s going to be
a very difficult time. The proposals we are seeing coming out of
Governor Cuomo’s office, the state addresses, are very much not in line with the initiatives
that we’re seeing the president-elect put out. And at some point, our federal government,
our state government and our locals are going to have to find ways to work together on behalf
of all of us. This is one of the reasons why, especially
the comments that President Obama made the other night with his farewell address, are
so important. We have to make sure people are speaking up,
getting off their social media and really engaging and organizing in their communities,
because the best way they can make sure their priorities are being heard is if their making
sure their voices are clear. And I think we’ve been seeing that with
a lot of the organizing that has been happening, especially around the potential repeal of
the Affordable Care Act. (Helene) I just want to ask, realistically
how do you think we can do some of those things? (Romeo) That’s by some of the basic things,
calling your local elected official’s office, taking a look at your neighboring congress
people and seeing what their positions are. Locally we know that Congresswoman Louise
Slaughter is a staunch defender of the Affordable Care Act but there are a lot of other members
of the now majority of Congress who likely are able to vote against them, and we want
to make sure that, as a region, we’re making that voice heard. Making sure that we’re following the state
legislative sessions, supporting our law makers. We’ve got lots of layers of lawmakers in
Monroe County, there are a lot of ways. And then you get down to maybe creating some
balance in local representation, on town boards or village trustee boards. There are a lot of opportunities. (Helene) Well both you and Chairman Bill Reilich
said jobs are a main focus for Monroe County moving forward, we’ll take a look at his
full response on that. (Reilich) I think creating jobs. Because I will tell you, a lot of the issues
you’ve just mentioned from racial issues to all the other issues, I think a lot of
those become diminished when people have good paying jobs, they’re able to put food on
the table and support their family. I think that’s the number one concern on
everyone’s mind; do they have money for tomorrow’s food, do they have money to pay
the utilities, to keep a roof over their head, to keep people clothed. And when you have a job that’s paying a
decent wage, we’ve seen for generations in Monroe County, whether it be Kodak, Bausch
& Lomb, Gleasons, Xerox, and on and on and on, that those jobs vaporized in a combination
of the high tax structure of New York State with new technologies in the computer age. And now we’re seeing a president that is
bringing back a lot of those jobs. I think as more and more of that occurs, I
think a lot of those other issues kind of become diminished, because people are able
to support the needs of their family. (Helene) Jamie before we close, I’d like
to give you an opportunity to respond. (Romeo) I think absolutely, jobs are important,
but it’s not just about having a living wage and making sure that you can support
your family, but that the system is fair, and it’s fair for everyone. That’s why job creation is important, but
we have to make sure that on all levels everybody has an equal chance in this country. WE’LL HAVE TO WRAP FOR NOW, BUT I’LL LOOK
FORWARD TO HAVING BOTH YOU AND BILL REILICH TOGETHER IN THE STUDIO IN THE NEAR-FUTURE. BE SURE TO TUNE IN LIVE TO THE PRESIDENTIAL
INAUGURATION OF DONALD TRUMP. THAT’S ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 20TH STARTING
AT 11 A-M ON W-X-X-I TV. ROADSIDE BILLBOARDS ARE GOING UP AROUND THE
COUNTRY THIS MONTH FEATURING THE FACE OF A ROCHESTER CHILD. HER NAME IS BROOK STAGLES. POLICE SAY THE THREE-YEAR-OLD WHO DIED LATE
LAST YEAR WAS THE VICTIM OF A HOMICIDE. HER FATHER AND HIS GIRLFRIEND HAVE BEEN CHARGED
IN HER DEATH. IT’S THE GRANDFATHER OF BROOK STAGLES WHO
IS PUTTING THE BILLBOARDS UP TO RAISE AWARENESS AROUND CHILD ABUSE. HE HAS TOLD LOCAL MEDIA OUTLETS THAT CHILD
PROTECTIVE SERVICES WAS NOTIFIED ABOUT BROOK’S SITUATION WEEKS BEFORE HER DEATH. BUT IT’S NO SECRET THAT C-P-S WORKERS HAVE
MORE CASES THAN THEY CAN HANDLE – AND THE NUMBERS ARE ONLY GOING UP. WHY IS THIS HAPPENING, HOW IS THIS HAPPENING,
AND REALISTICALLY WHAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP FIX IT? JOINING ME FOR THIS DISCUSSION IS BRIGIT HURLEY
– POLICY ANALYST FOR THE CHILDREN’S AGENDA AND JOHN RABISH – A FORMER C-P-S WORKER AND
AN EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBER OF THE FEDERATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS. WELCOME… (Helene) So we don’t have specifics or facts
in regards to the claims made by Brook Stagles’ grandfather in terms of the numbers of calls
made to Child Protective Services about that situation. But how common, or is it common, for some
types of complaints to be made such as that? Calls are made, they’re not returned, that
things aren’t happening because of case overload for example. (Rabish) A case overload is a huge problem. The Child Welfare League of America, which
is accepted expert in the field of children’s services for the entire nation, has established
12 as the maximum caseload for CPS investigators. At the end of December, the average load for
CPS investigators in Monroe County was 29, more than 29. So it’s two and half times what experts
in the field are saying can effectively be handled by one human being. So that leads to compromising effectiveness
to some extent on a case that’s just more work than can be done. It would be like asking the county executive
to cover Monroe, Erie and Livingston counties all at once. (Hurley) As you said this is not a brand new
problem, the county itself has acknowledged the overload on case workers and their reports
to the New York State Office of Children & Family Services. So, it’s been an acknowledged problem, particularly
on not filling vacancies so a vacancy would be created in the division of CPS and not
filled. They have taken some steps to remedy that. They’re running more training classes for
CPS workers. They are fully funding all of the CPS positions
which in the past they would perhaps save some money by not filling a position, now
the county is committed to filling them. We still think this is not enough because
of everything John just mentioned in terms of overload and there’s also quite a bit
of time between the time that you hire a CPS worker and they’re fully trained and ready
to go, so we have some real concerns about whether there’s enough in the pipeline and
also going forward there’s no guarantee that they’re not going go back to that practice
of not filling. So our primary recommendation around CPS is
that the county automatically fills vacancies; right now it has to be requested and approved. There are some divisions within the county
where as soon as there’s a vacancy, say for example the sheriff’s department, as
soon as there’s a vacancy, that’s approved to be filled. And that’s what we’d like to see in CPS. (Helene) I just want to make a point that
we did invite a representative for Child & Family Services with Monroe County to join our conversation
and we will extend that opportunity to them in the future as well to be a part of this. So I want to make sure that viewers really
get an understanding of the work of a CPS investigator beyond insuring and trying to
protect a child’s safety. John, I’ll ask you to do this for me. Can you give us, you spent 27 years as a Child
Protective Services Investigator, can you give us a glimpse at the job, the role, what
it involves? (Rabish) Certainly. But before, I’d like to touch a little bit
on the vacancy issue. We currently think there are 40 vacancies
in Child Protective Services. And there were 28 positions authorized by
the county executive to be filled. Unfortunately, they could only find 21 people
to even accept those 28 positions and 3 of those people that were in the training class
have since dropped out. So we have 18 people to fill 40 vacancies
and we think there are many more positions to be added. As far as the job itself, it’s a demanding,
difficult, stressful, rewarding and sometimes dangerous job. CPS investigators are given a report with
allegations of abuse and/or neglect and have to go out to the home to confront the parents
about what’s going on in the home. Besides (Helene) Is that where the danger can come
in? Just the act of confronting? (Rabish) Absolutely. It’s unpredictable how people will respond
when confronted with having you tell them that they’ve neglected or abused their child. There are a lot of potential dangers; CPS
workers are subjected to much verbal abuse. We’ve had workers that have been physically
assaulted; it can be a dangerous job. The part of the job that I think people don’t
understand is it’s not just investigations. When a CPS worker goes up to a home and there’s
an allegation of not enough food, clothing, shelter, they don’t just go back to the
office and say “Well, that’s true”, they immediately take some action to help
get the family food, to help get them shelter if they don’t have a home, to help get them
evaluations for things like addiction, substance abuse problem. So there are other facets to the job other
than just doing investigations. (Helene) Some of the data that you shared,
John, from the Federation of Social Workers, goes back to we talked about case overload,
and you both went into detail about that, and some of the numbers from Monroe County
that you shared, 17 workers with 30 or 39 cases; 8 workers with 40 to 49 cases; 5 workers
with 50 to 59 cases. So I’m trying to understand how that happens. Is there a labor agreement of some sorts in
place to ensure that there are 12 cases as recommended that 12 cases per worker? I don’t quite understand how the buildup
happens. Yes, you mentioned the vacancies and we got
into that. Does it all rest on that or is there a funding
issue, are there other issues that we need to be aware of with this? (Hurley) Well it’s clearly a funding issue
because there are, this notion that fully funding every position, as opposed to letting
some vacancies continue, is new. Clearly the county is putting more resources
into filling those positions but we have a lot of work to make up in terms of that and
so as John said, even with three training classes being provided in 2016 and 2017, there’s
no guarantee that’s going to fill all of the open positions. The other thing I would just add is that adding
to this issue is that the county has cut preventive programs which are programs to prevent families
from even entering into the CPS system and that’s a real funding issue as well. (Helene) In terms of the influx of cases that
you mentioned; you mentioned this increase from November to December; what do we know
what’s contributing to that? Beyond vacancies, that just seems that the
numbers are continuing to go up? (Rabish) The initial spike occurred in 2015
when the local child abuse hotline was eliminated from the county operation and all reports
went directly to New York State. The local hotline folks, there was a team
there that screened calls and did some work to reduce the number of cases that actually
went to investigative workers. Because you have to fully investigate even
cases that reports that we think are somewhat frivolous at this point. The other important to remember for the public
is a case doesn’t involve once child. Cases involve multiple children; we have families
of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 kids and each child has to have a safety and risk assessment done. There have to be collateral contacts made
with medical people in schools, neighbors, friends. So one case may in some ways be like 5 or
6 cases because you have to address the safety issues that are involved with every single
child who’s named in the report or who’s living in the household. (Helene) John, you’ve been inside of CPS,
Brigit, the Children’s Agenda, you have been tracking child abuse and maltreatment
issues for quite some time and to let viewers know, you discussed some of the things, the
recommendations made by the Children’s Agenda, specifically when it comes to the recent Monroe
County budget, the budget proposal for 2017. What are other recommendations, realistic
measures besides what we’ve already discussed, that can help to address and fix this issue? (Hurley) So there’s automatically filling
the positions within CPS. There’s increasing the number of positions
so that would then add additional workers for CPS because it does appear that there’s
been this market increase. There’s actually been a long term trend
of increases but we have seen in the past couple of years sort of a striking increase
from year to year so that’s a real concern. The other thing that we recommend around CPS
workers in particular is just more support and more training, more ongoing resources
because it is such a stressful job that you really need to surround these folks. We consider them first responders, they’re
walking into homes where there’s a lot of need so we need to support the workers that
are already in place. (Helene) Well, a special thank you to both
of you, we have to wrap now but we’ll come back and, again, I invite Monroe County to
join the conversation so hopefully can come back to this again. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON WHAT WE’VE DISCUSSED
TODAY – BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THE CHILDREN’S AGENDA WEBSITE WHERE YOU CAN FIND THEIR LATEST
REPORT WHICH IS A REVIEW OF THE PROPOSED MONROE COUNTY BUDGET FOR 2017. JUST GO TO: THE-CHILDRENS-AGENDA-DOT-ORG. ((HELENE TOSS TO SASHA))
ROCHESTER’S EAST HIGH SCHOOL IS PART OF A SELECT GROUP CHOSEN TO PARTICIPATE IN THE
“STUDENT SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIMENTS PROGRAM.” IT’S A PROGRAM THAT SENDS THE HARD WORK
OF HIGH SCHOOLERS ON A REAL MISSION TO OUTER-SPACE. WXXI’S SASHA-ANN SIMONS JOINS US NOW WITH
MORE. ((SASHA)) THAT’S RIGHT, HELENE. A GROUP OF EAST HIGH STUDENTS HAVE CREATED
A SCIENCE EXPERIMENT THAT’S READY FOR TAKE OFF. THE TRIO SPENT WEEKS AT THE START OF THE SCHOOL
YEAR, WRITING A DETAILED PROPOSAL ABOUT HOW THEIR PROJECT – WHICH FOCUSES ON MICROGRAVITY
– WOULD BE USEFUL IN SPACE. AND — SUCCESS. THEIR BIG IDEA IS HEADING TO THE INTERNATIONAL
SPACE STATION. I SPENT SOME TIME WITH THOSE KIDS — AND THE
TEACHER WHO HELPED PUSH THE VISION TO NEW HEIGHTS. So you’re putting the same wavelength of
light through it and then you’re measuring the difference in absorbance When East High School chemistry teacher Mary
Courtney submitted three proposals last fall for the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program,
she couldn’t wait to find out which one would take off…literally. This was a very difficult project. It’s probably the most difficult project
that our students do their entire time in high school. As part of the program, students from 21 schools
across North America were competing for the chance to have their science experiments that
test how microgravity affects various organisms, sent to space. Students De’Aunte Johnson, Tailor Davis
and Binti Mohamed were thrilled that their proposal was the winning one from East High. Ms. Courtney pushed us aside and was like
you won and I was like are you serious, like I started freaking out. They chose to conduct their research on a
group of microscopic organisms called Phytoplankton – which live in lakes and oceans. Through the process of photosynthesis, the
organism produces half the oxygen we have on earth. The question is when this goes to space, is
there an effect by not having gravity on the production of the chlorophyll, and the other
variable that happens, is this experiment is going to be kept in a dark container and
so it’s not going to be exposed to oxygen. Johnson is the captain of this student spaceship. We had a couple different choices but we picked
mine. (So this was your idea?) It was my idea but I had to bounce my idea
off them a couple times to make sure we got it correct. The final proposal was a true team effort,
though. There were parts we all had to do. Tailor was doing the introduction and De’Aunte
was doing part three and four, stuff like that. De’Aunte reviewed it later on and changed
certain stuff that we needed to clarify or get into more detail with So, why did they choose Phytoplankton? As the US and other countries move forward
with space exploration, the idea is to eventually establish colonies – either on the moon,
other planets. So if you’re on Mars, you’ve got to be
able to produce food. That means the work is far from over. The 21 winning experiments will blast off
in a mini-laboratory to the International Space Station in June. The first order of business for the East High
team is to figure out which type of phytoplankton they’ll use. And also which type of mixture we’re going
to use to make sure they have enough nutrients when they go up into space. The students are getting acquainted with a
Spectrophotometer – a machine that measures the intensity of light, and is perhaps what
will be their saving grace. And If you haven’t guessed it already, there’s
a lot riding on this student project. Once the experiment is aboard the space station,
astronauts will interact with it – based on guidelines set by these three. As the person who’s watched it all come
to life, Courtney says she couldn’t be more proud. I want them to think completely differently
about everything around them at the end of the year. If I do that, if they think differently about
everyday subjects, then I’ve accomplished my goal. Sasha-Ann Simons, WXXI News. AND THAT WRAPS UP THIS EDITION OF “NEED
TO KNOW” ROCHESTER’S NEWS MAGAZINE PROGRAM. I’M YOUR HOST, HELENE BIANDUDI HOFER. THANK YOU FOR TUNING IN TONIGHT AND THROUGHOUT
THE WEEKEND HERE ON W-X-X-I TV. AND WE APPRECIATE THOSE OF YOU WHO JOIN US
ONLINE AT W-X-X-I-NEWS-DOT-ORG. I’LL SEE YOU AGAIN RIGHT HERE, NEXT THURSDAY
NIGHT.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *