U.S. Government EXPOSED (Government Shutdown Explained)

U.S. Government EXPOSED (Government Shutdown Explained)


So recently the U.S. Government decided it needed to shut down. But why is that? How come government shutdowns are even an
option? And what exactly IS Chuck Schumer? All those questions, and more, will be answered
in this, this first and probably only episode of Harry Explains U.S. Politics Really Badly
and In Such A Way That Inveigles Meaning and Defies Understanding. Just kidding, most of my videos inveigle meaning
and defy understanding. Ha ha, I’m so alone. So as of Friday at midnight, D.C. time, the
federal government of the USA had to close. The reason was very simple: government had quite literally run out of money. That doesn’t make sense, though, I hear you ask; the U.S. government has a bunch of money sloshing around, right? How can it not have any money anymore, when it takes in a bunch of cash in taxes and revenue and whatnot? Well, it’s really quite simple: he federal government can’t spend any money without the approval of Congress, and
for that reason if Congress doesn’t approve the spending of money, then the federal government
can’t spend it, and if the federal government can’t spend money then they have no money
and they can’t do anything. It’s really no more complicated than that
– and on Friday, the most recent federal budget expired. That means the federal government could not
spend money after that point, and a whole tranche of federal services had to be shut
down. So what happens then? Well, according to the BBC, essential services
continue to run: energy generation, the national security infrastructure, that sort of thing. National parks, however, are among one of
the things that get shut down, though the Trump administration did manage some finagling
to keep many of them open. One national landmark that was shut was the
iconic Statue of Liberty building which remained closed until New York Governor Cuomo dipped into state funds to keep the area open. The point is, government infrastructure deemed
non-essential gets shut, meaning about half of federal employees in a number of federal
departments and agencies simply weren’t able to turn up to work on Monday morning. Thankfully, the government reopened not long
after the shutdown; Congress agreed a spending bill that will fund the federal government
through February 8th this year, giving them a little over two weeks (at time of writing)
to come up with something permanent. But how did we get here in the first place? Well, cast your minds back a few days to a
bipartisan immigration meeting at the White House. High-ranking Congressional Democrats and Republicans
met in Trump’s cabinet room to discuss making a deal on Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals,
or DACA, a policy brought in under the Obama Administration by executive action that gives
something of a path to citizenship to people brought into the United States illegally as
young children. It’s a program that, allegedly, many on
both sides of the congressional aisle support – but then Donald Trump did his whole “s-hole
countries” bit and the Democrats walked. As a result of a failure to reach a deal,
the Democrats refused to vote for a bill that would fund the government last Friday unless
the Republicans agreed to hold an up-down vote on DACA, which Senate Majority Leader
and man who looks like a turtle in human skin Mitch McConnell did not agree to. But hang on for just one second there, Harry,
my good man, I hear you say. The Republicans have majorities in both chambers
of Congress, AND they control the White House. Why can’t they just pass a budget on their
own? Well, there’s a few reasons for that, firstly
that the Republicans didn’t even all vote for the budget proposal that they submitted
to the Senate floor last Friday. Secondly, due to bizarre Senate arcana, the
Senate can’t actually pass the funding bill – called an “appropriations bill” in American
political parlance – without a total of sixty votes, formally referred to as breaking the
filibuster. Why does it need sixty votes at all, though? Well, here’s the thing: the Senate is really
big on deliberation, so much so that it will continue debating something as long as somebody
wants to, meaning you can only end debate with what’s called a motion for cloture
that takes 60 votes to pass, meaning in turn the Democrats could just keep debating the
bill and stop them from being able to actually vote on it, thus why the motion is referred
to as “breaking the filibuster”. In practice, the Republican majority in the
Senate isn’t a working majority because it isn’t enough to force a vote on anything,
meaning that the Democrats just kept debating the bill and sent the government over a fiscal
cliff-edge. The Democrats reneged on blocking the bill
at the end of business on Monday, allowing the government to reopen. In exchange, they got a concession from Senate
Majority Leader and guy who honestly looks like he just needs a hug Mitch McConnell,
that they would consider allowing an up-down vote on DACA, which sounds like a cop-out,
because honestly that’s what it is. Democrats are concerned because they consider
this promise to be one written in sand – intending to do something and actually doing something
are two different things entirely, after all. That being said, McConnell, too, is in a dangerous
position. The agreement between him and the Democratic
caucus only funds the government until February 8th, which, as I’ve said, is not far away,
meaning they need to strike a more permanent deal or we’re just going to be back here,
where we started, in a few days time, and there’s nothing to indicate the Democrats
will actually back down again. Where is Trump in all of this? The man who framed himself as dealmaker-in-chief
was largely absent from negotiations to reopen the government, probably for good reason;
his contribution to the debate so far has been mainly to insult the people on the other
side of the negotiating table, which as everyone knows is key to getting them to agree to help
you with stuff. Trump’s made the point that his border wall
must be appropriated for in a long-term spending bill before he’ll sign anything DACA-related
into law, a point he made clear in a tweet to Cryin’ Chuck Schumer earlier today. This is the world we live in. This is the leader of the supposedly free
world, which is why in 2040 y’all lads need to elect me president so we can make America
Harius again. When was it Harius before? I don’t know. So that’s where we’re at. Donald Trump is nowhere to be seen, the Democrats
and Republicans are probably going to argue over the government again in a few days and
fail to reach a deal, spiralling the federal government into shutdown and bankruptcy
lol, DACA will probably get shut down at Trump’s deadline in March, and the president will
probably complain about it on Twitter because again, this is reality and it cannot be escaped. As President Donald Trump himself once said, “it
never ends”. It never ends. It never ends.

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