Darrin Bell & Michael Ramirez: 2016 National Book Festival

Darrin Bell & Michael Ramirez: 2016 National Book Festival


>>From the Library of
Congress in Washington, D.C.>>Michael Cavna: That is moved
from Memphis, went to the LA Times, went to Investors Business Daily. You know it’s– in this era two
Pulitzers doesn’t necessarily guarantee one newspaper anymore but where he goes he
takes tremendous talent. So we have both from the left and from the right
two great cartoonists. Please welcome up here Darrin
Bell and Michael Ramirez. [ Applause ] All right. Please.>>Michael Ramirez: You know, I’m thrilled to meet
Johnny Depp in person. [ Laughter ]>>Michael Cavna: Tell me, if he’d send us paychecks my
way, it’ll be a good thing. Well thank you guys so much. And first, you know, often
political cartoonists, people have an impression. They sense that it must be
this curmudgeon of somewhere and you know, must sort of feel
whether the left or the right sort of bitter or angry all the time. And actually political
cartoonists are often some of the happiest people I
know because their vitriol is in their pen and they get it
out and they’re often some of the healthiest people I know. But they often have the
least opportunity to get to the public to know them. So with each of you, you know,
I was like doing origin stories. So Darrin I know you
were born in LA.>>Darrin Bell: Right.>>Michael Cavna: And you know, can
you tell us a little bit about like when did you get– do you remember
when you first got political. Or were your parents
political people? When did you feel that?>>Darrin Bell: My parents
weren’t really political but our newspaper was. I remember they added Bloom County.>>Michael Cavna: Were
you reading The Times or?>>Darrin Bell: This was
back a long time ago. Every city had more than one paper.>>Michael Cavna: Sure.>>Darrin Bell: So,
we got The Times, we got the– what was the other one?>>Michael Cavna: The Herex? Herald exam?>>Michael Ramirez: Oh,
the Herald Examiner.>>Darrin Bell: Herald Examiner.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Yes. So I don’t know which one
it was in, the both of them. But all I knew was there
was a penguin and I had to see what it was doing everyday. And one day, it mentioned
Caspar Weinberger and that was a funny sounding word. I had to figure– I just had to
know what he was talking about.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I was
like five or six.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So that was
my — that’s how I got in.>>Michael Cavna: Most kids of five
or six of this Casper the ghost and you’re getting from Berkeley
Breathed Caspar Weinberger and you’re on. And so Michael, I know
believe you’re born in Tokyo.>>Michael Ramirez: Yes.>>Michael Cavna: And how long of
growing up did you spend there? And did you move around
and what were you reading?>>Michael Ramirez:
My mom is Japanese.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah?>>Michael Ramirez: So I am — the
first language I spoke was Japanese which is why you may not
understand my cartoons. I lived there until
I was around six.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
then we went back state side and then back to Japan. My dad was in the army for 23 years.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Michael Ramirez: I kind
of followed him around. And I lived in Germany for two
years and Belgium for a year.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah?>>Michael Ramirez: We lived
in Paris for eight months.>>Michael Cavna: Were you
picking up languages as you go or?>>Michael Ramirez: No, but I was
getting a pretty deep wrap sheet in different languages. An InterPol got my picture. And you know, it’s fine– my mom
is Japanese, my dad is half-Mexican and half-Spanish so I’m
completely confused.>>Michael Cavna: Well, it doesn’t
come through in your cartoon. It comes through crystal clear. So you know, what I think,
when I started thinking about editorial cartooning
years ago, they were thick through across the land, right? We had you know, we used to have
200 at least, political cartoonist, staff political cartoonist. And then it would dwindle. It was like 70 and maybe now, 30 officially full time cartoonists
maybe and then you have–>>Michael Ramirez:
Three, three and a half.>>Michael Cavna: What? Which is shrinking. But you know, and comic strips
indication has changed so much. Sales aren’t the same. But you guys, I mean,
you’re so talented. Do you ever think about selling
in charts or decide you know, these are my skills and this
is what I’m passionate about. And regardless of the
market, you know, what motivates you, is
it having that voice?>>Darrin Bell: Well, it’s partly
what you said at the beginning. We were the most– Some of the
most common people, you know. You can imagine because
this is like art therapy–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: For adults. I mean, I get to talk
about Trump and Clinton. All the time through my pen
and then afterwards I’m happy. I got it out. And I feel like what
we do is important. What we — I think back to when I
was a kid, this is the kind of thing that made me reading
Conrad, reading Bloom County, that’s what made me interested in
politics and then the wider world.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. That would be Paul Conrad who
was an icon at the LA Times.>>Darrin Bell: Right. And so I feel like you know,
whenever I draw a cartoon, I know that some little kid
somewhere is going to see it and think, I have to know what this
guy is talking about and he’s going to want to go read and find
out for himself and start to think critically about the world. So it’s– I see this as a service.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I could have
gone to Trump University and– and be real state or something.>>Michael Cavna: Sale stakes.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: You
know, I never aspired to be a political cartoonist. I want to be in cardiovascular
service.>>Michael Cavna: That’s
right, medicine.>>Michael Ramirez: All my brothers and sisters are doctors
except for me. I’m the black sheep of the family.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah?>>Michael Ramirez: And my
relative calm just comes from the electroshock
therapy that I have. But I’m a big believer
in what we do.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
as corny as it sounds, I think I view editorial
cartooning as pure journalism. In fact, it’s quite some of the most
effective journalism because people to read the editorial page
always turn to the cartoons. So it can have a profound impact. But you know, I never
set out to draw a cartoon for I never thought about it. The first cartoon I
ever did was in college.>>Michael Cavna: Well,
in UC Irvine?>>Michael Ramirez:
Yeah at UC Irvine.>>Michael Cavna: Did
you get a reaction to it?>>Michael Ramirez: Like you know, there is an ulterior
motive for everything. In high school, we
have closed campus. You couldn’t leave campus except–
the exception of having a hall pass from the office or a press pass. The guy who control the press pass
was the editor of the newspaper, so naturally, I became the
editor of the newspaper. And you know, whatever the waves
got over three foot, you know, I had to go over there and
report how the surfing was.>>Michael Cavna: Sure absolutely.>>Michael Ramirez: And so I
wrote, and then when I went into college, I continued to write. And you know, I wrote editorials. I wrote reviews. I found out that you could
get albums and tickets to the world premiers and
both Darrin and I lived in LA. That’s a bonus. You get free stuff.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And all you
have to do is just write about it. Now I was a triple major in
college, biological sciences, fine arts studio, painting
and art history. And the only reason why
I did the latter two was because my older brother and
sister who preceded me said, the medical schools are looking
for well-rounded students. They don’t want straight bioscience
students, so why don’t you since you can draw, why
don’t you do that art thing?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And UCI had
a very conceptual art department. And I could make up really
good excuses for bad art. And so I was just doing that and
one day I was filing the story and my editor looked at the cartoon. And I mean, at the painting,
I was looking on, she said, now we have a student
election going on right now. What don’t you do a cartoon on that?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And so, I tried to interview all the
candidates, only met with two. Looked into the other
ones and found out, there was no real platform
for running.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And so
I made fun of all of them. And the day that cartoon came
out, we had three days worth of protest with this cartoon.>>Michael Cavna: You
generated by you?>>Michael Ramirez: But
my generated by my–>>Michael Cavna: Or your cartoon?>>Michael Ramirez: And I got
called from the student government to apologize to the school
because I needed to be educated. And so, I appeared in front
of the student council and I said you guys
were absolutely right. I do need to be educated. That’s why I’m pursuing
three degrees. But thank you for your concern. And then I left, but I realized
that I’ve been running all the stuff that I thought was having an impact.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: That
you draw one cartoon and half the campus hates you. What a great forum.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah there you go.>>Michael Ramirez: And so
that really count my interest, although I hadn’t changed
my career path.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: It
wasn’t until my plus– it was until my junior
year in college. We had the sense– a local
paper who hired me got a month and a half after I started it. In the new university,
called the Newport Incident.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
And it was a great deal because I usually took
this break to go surfing between Organic Chemistry
and Bio 1O1.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And this
place was just along the away.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
And so I could get into a little mischief you
know, without a cartoon. I got $50 of cartoon.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
With a good pay back. And then, there’s this incident where the Newport Beach
Police pulled over this guy, arrested him for drunk driving,
then allowing the phone call. And as it turned out, he was
a Newport City councilman who didn’t drink. That’s why I did this cartoon where
I had this guy hard tied on the hood of a police car with a
shoe wedge in his mouth and the arresting officer was
explaining to his sergeant, I was merely reinforcing
his constitutional right to remain silent.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And I went
into the office there one day and the police chief
happened to be there. And he was yelling at the publisher
and he was yelling at the editor.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And then he
tried to find out where I lived.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Michael Ramirez: And I realized,
what a profound impact this dryness. So I think that was the
moment I fell in love with the political cartooning.>>Michael Cavna: Absolutely. Well this year hasn’t
given us much to do. But I literally was in the gift
shop, I needed something to eat and there was– it was literally
a basket of deplorable skittles. And there were too many
political metaphors in one basket. And I couldn’t literally eat it. But let us go through. Michael, this is your– from
the cover from your book, “Give Me Liberty or
Give Me Obamacare”, you’ve had a wealth, you know. It’s always that makes blessing. You may not agree politically
with who’s an office, but what material they give you
and you’ve had seven and a half and counting years of Obama.>>Michael Ramirez: Absolutely its– this is the administration that’s
the gift that keeps on giving. And you know, in this
presidential election cycle’s been like Christmas all year round. In fact, I don’t even think I’m
an editorial cartoonist anymore. I’m a glorified stenographer. One of the best gag writers in
the business, working for me, they’re called politician. I’m just taking notes. But you know, this book picks
up where the first book ended. At the beginning of the Obama
Administration, so we kind of– I am an equal opportunity offender. Although I’m a right
wing conservative, in the end of knuckle dragging. But believe me, there’s enough
from politics to go around.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, absolutely. So we’ll look at some of these and
you can go to michaelpramirez.com to follow him, so that
was information. So let’s look– This is
the building of a cartoon because there’s a magic to it. So, could you talk about sort of the
process of how a cartoon is born?>>Michael Ramirez: You know,
Michael, the strange thing is when I think of the ideas I see
in images, and so, this is– first, I’m not sure
is a cocktail napkin. I have–>>Michael Cavna: Literally,
drawing on a cocktail–>>Michael Ramirez:
On a cocktail napkin. And the way this began was
that I had a weekly process where I would meet with a friend
of mine, who is so well-read. He knows every subject
you could think of. We read newspapers. We talk politics for two
hours while we you know, eat tacos, 99 Cent Tacos.>>Michael Cavna: Yes.>>Michael Ramirez: And so, I would
think of ideas while we’re talking and I would just sketch it
out on these little napkins. And I ended up stealing napkins
every week, so I get a big pile. But every time I think of an
idea, because of so much going on, I automatically just
sketch out on a napkin. So this is the beginning
of the process for here.>>Michael Cavna: OK.>>Michael Ramirez: And then what
I do is I transfer to you know, I just copy a paper, so that I have
a larger, more recognizable version of it that I can send
out to a group of guys. Now, I started doing this when I
was co-managing the editorial page that invests with business daily,
about eight people that I sort of rely on for their opinion.>>Michael Cavna: You
trust their sense?>>Michael Ramirez: Right. And I’ll email it to them
and try to find, you know, which ones are the best ones. And they tell me which ones they
like the most and they ignore them and then just do whatever I want.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: But then
it comes out too in the black and white statue because
we’ve run cartoons both in color and black and white.>>Michael Cavna: And
then you do your color?>>Michael Ramirez: And then
the color is done on Photoshop. And this is pretty
much the final copy. So if you could see from the
napkin sketch to the final, it pretty much looks the same.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. You know, some cartoonists like
to keep everything very simple, and you talked about joy. There’s joy. You seemed to beautifully
design the framing and you’re like filling up the frame. Is it something?>>Michael Ramirez: Well you know, it’s the ulterior motive,
date and the trap.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: Now, people
are drawn to the visual medium. And people know, philosophically
and politically where I stand. But if you can make the
illustration, you know, interesting enough,
then regardless of that, they’re going to have
to want to take a peek.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: Once you take
a peek, then you’ve got them.>>Michael Cavna: You’ve
got them in.>>Michael Ramirez: You know, I’m
a big believer in this art form. What we’re just trying to have
is a big of impact is possible, to reach as many people as possible
and be the catalyst for thought.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And so
you know, everybody loves art.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, well let’s
take a peek at some of your work. So tell us about “We
the Government”.>>Michael Ramirez: So now this is– these were cartoons
that are in the book. “We the Government” is pretty
simple and straightforward cartoon. The way I think about it is
political cartoons are sort of like the Super Bowl ads. You had a few seconds
to seize our attention. Three seconds to make the sale and
the only difference is, with the, you know, political cartoons,
you’re selling an idea. With the Super Bowl ad,
they’re selling a product.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
This is just a simple, straightforward representation
of how we’ve shifted from being a Democratic Republic
that is ruled by the people shifting to the power of the government. And here’s the “United
States Dollar Made in China”.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And I have
huge, in tiles signature down there.>>Michael Cavna: Love it. OK.>>Michael Ramirez: “Give me Liberty or Give Me a Government
Bay Allowance.”>>Michael Cavna: Yes.>>Michael Ramirez: Where
I got the title of my book. It was originally going to be
“Conservatives are from Mars and Progressives are from
Uranus” but they rejected that.>>Michael Cavna: Couldn’t do it. Could it– And you send that up to the eighth gang
[inaudible] that one right. Then you got Obama
with the selfie here.>>Michael Ramirez: The selfie is
in your realm, his realm is burning.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, absolutely. Now you really, I mean, cartoonists
like your drama the Big Ears, but you really, I mean it’s
like lips and then full on ear.>>Michael Ramirez: But you
know what, the way I stylized and of course his eyes
are always half closed, who’s looking down his nose and–>>Michael Cavna: OK.>>Michael Ramirez: And then the
ears are getting bigger every time there’s an end truth
or half truth or a lie. And so, I think by the end of
December, he might just be, two little beady eyes
and two [inaudible].>>Michael Cavna: Wow, OK. Let’s see, and then
the Mountain Day.>>Michael Ramirez: Right,
someday all this will be yours. And you know, when
you think about it, you’ve got $20 trillion
of national debt.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
We’ve got, you know, the federal budget
is like $3 trillion. You put then perspectives. We have $128 trillion dollars and unfunded liabilities
from entitlements.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And what
we’re giving our kids, I mean, $20 trillion, I don’t
know what it was. At $17 trillion, it was like
$54,000 worth of depth per person.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. It’s not going away and so.>>Michael Ramirez: And this is my
12, 13, we need a president which, I can’t read it exactly, but
basically the gag at the cartoon is that everything they described, prescribed to Trump is exactly
what our president Obama has done for the last seven and a half years.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah. And then weekend–>>Michael Ramirez:
Weekend at Bernie’s.>>Michael Cavna: Yes. [ Laughter ]>>Michael Ramirez: You know, I
wish I can make stop pics as well as I could, carton predictions.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah,
that’s beautiful.>>Michael Ramirez:
That’s pretty solid.>>Michael Cavna: And then you
have great found with Trump’s hair, his lips– I mean, you
go to tell him on this. Could you talk about–>>Michael Ramirez: You know, Trump
has just been a wonderful gift.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And here,
it’s building the wall, you know, he saying some of the right things. But he says only the
wrong things all the time. We just want him to stop– I had another cartoon where I had
a Trump sticker cross his mouth. That was he can promote
himself but not say anything.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
Let’s for his campaign.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah,
that’s beautiful, yeah. And you get into the eyebrows
too as beautifully as the hair. Some people miss the
art of that eyebrow.>>Michael Ramirez: Well you know, character interests are an important
element of political cartoon. Because they actually define the
personality as well, when you think of Richard Nixon during
Watergate, you look at– you know, the cartoon said,
just seated that period.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: Where he
wasn’t so dark and he didn’t have that you know, [inaudible]
at 9’o clock in the morning.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah,
he got jollier.>>Michael Ramirez: Right.>>Michael Cavna: And the
whole thing changed, the nose–>>Michael Ramirez: It’s
darker, more foreboding.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. This one always shocks me,
the old that the you know–>>Michael Ramirez: Hillary in 2016
which is– once again, it’s just, in these cartoons, I think resonate
the best and pretty straightforward.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And basically
I’m saying Hillary Clinton is a third turn for Barack Obama.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah and then
always strange a bit of fellows.>>Michael Ramirez: Right and
this is the cartoon I drew after the Republican Convention
which is the morning after. Then suddenly after
they’re drunk in the party, they realize who they’ve
woken up with.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Michael Ramirez: I was
saying I was amazing, I know.>>Michael Cavna: You’ve sent
this to me a couple of weeks ago and I did not sleep well that night. I had to get those out of my head. And now, I won’t sleep
at all tonight either, so that’s a little [inaudible]. So this–>>Michael Ramirez: This is
the cartoon I did the day after the Democratic Convention. You see it’s confetti, and
now it’s Hillary’s e-mails.>>Michael Cavna: That’s beautiful.>>Michael Ramirez: That’s right.>>Michael Cavna: That’s beautiful
and the detail is just gorgeous. OK. And playing off a
movie title, obviously.>>Michael Ramirez: And
so we use iconic images that people can relate to.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, it’s
like a current culture survey.>>Michael Ramirez: Right. It’s you know, it’s
sort of a you know, hitching your cartoon to the star. Whenever people are focused on,
whatever I can utilize to get people to look at the cartoons
where I can have the impact. This is based on the Angry
Bird’s movie obviously. And I just have one angry bird, the
American eagle and you’re saying, really out of 320 million
people, with the two best with–>>Michael Cavna: These
are our choices?>>Michael Ramirez: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: OK.>>Michael Ramirez: And then
here, it depends on fire. We determine what started
the massive fires. Hillary Clinton’s pants, and
saying what– and to be accurate, it should say pant suits on fire.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yes. I recognized those are
from [inaudible] and so–>>Michael Ramirez:
And then you know, everybody has a “I Tramp
Stamp” this is the Trump stamp. And I always have that tattoo
that you sort of regret it.>>Michael Cavna: Yes, exactly. Wake up in the next
morning and there– yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And a little
version of the Clinton Foundation. This is what the foundation
of the Clinton Foundation, which is our huge bags of money. I feel humbled to be
here since you guys are– you’re paying me $200,000, right?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. Of course, of course, yeah. We’ll just talk to the foundation. They control that fund. And so here, you got a double,
sort of twin shot of both of them.>>Michael Ramirez: Right. Right, I was thinking
about these candidates. And a friend of mine was
making campaign buns. And it inspired me for
this idea, what you say. At least he’s not Hillary,
at least he’s not Trump. She seems to be the
focus of this election. In the fading light of liberty, in
this policy of leading from beyond.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. That just makes me sad for them.>>Michael Cavna: You know, I was
influenced by Paul Conrad as well.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And I read that
newspaper every morning with my dad.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
Swap papers and– So largely, Jeff McNelly [assumed
spelling] and Paul Conrad. And I was friends with
both of them –>>Michael Cavna: Sure.>>Michael Ramirez: And
I love their cartoons. Paul and I could probably
not agree on a single thing.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: But
you cannot– You cannot– But admire the dramatic
nature of his work.>>Michael Cavna: The impact.>>Michael Ramirez: And
these beautiful you know, heartening dramatic images
and the powerful message which I believe that’s the
essence of editorial cartooning.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: I know a lot of
cartoonists today because we’ve kind of shifted from journalism
into infotainment.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez:
And I kind of think that editorial cartoonists ought to be a hero [inaudible]
doing about current events. So like the tonight show model up.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: But I’m a
big believer in editorial cartoon as an aspect of journalism.>>Michael Cavna: Absolutely.>>Michael Ramirez: And that the
sensitive messages are the most important element.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And so, I
mean, you don’t have to be able to draw an effect ironically
and if I don’t like to draw. Because my inability to capture
what I see in my mind’s eye, and that was frustrating.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: Therefore,
the electroshock treatments puts– or I just watch, you know, I
turn on CSPAN and watch congress. And that doles on my
senses right there. But you know, I’m–
as corny as it sounds, I’m a big believer in the art form. I want to have an impact.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: In my stint
at the Memphis Commercial Appeal, there’s instance where during
that, it was the early 90s. And so, we’re just still going
through this poor economic times. And the Tennessee legislature
cannot pass their pay raise because constitutionally, they
have– have a vote of the people.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
so I was there at the end of the legislative session when
they’re passing these flurry bills.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And there
was one where they attached to this unrelated bill a writer
that increased their pension by 40%. I was there on the well at 1
o’clock in the morning in the house. I noticed this thing, showed
it to our national bureau guy. And I did this carton which had this
big pig and looked like amazingly like governor [inaudible],
I’m not saying that it is.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
his advisors were saying, how can you justify a 40%
pension increase in light of this budget short problem?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
what are you going to do when there’s a public outcry?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: And
the pig had a big smile on his face and he said retire.>>Michael Cavna: Wow, wow.>>Michael Ramirez: When
their cartoon had the stance with the accompanying article, they
were sent the bill on five days.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Michael Ramirez: So, I mean–
I’m a big believer on this art form. Passionately believe. You know, this– the essence of
where we live, this foundation of liberty that we
have and you know, we both visited art [inaudible]. We know what the price of
liberty and freedom is. I want to remind people that
this is their government. That these people are
their public servants.>>Michael Cavna: Absolutely.>>Michael Ramirez: And
they’re here to serve us and they’re here to do [inaudible].>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, absolutely. Well, a man that’s continuing
to do journalism and I you know, some people in a click
bait time want to offer just the best punch
line, the best, people used to say like it was a Jay Leno laugh line,
but to be able to deliver something with the power and force
and relevance, is to me, it was like what journalism
was about. So, and to go to that, let’s get with Darrin Bell’s work
more from the left. So, I think this one was from last
year Darrin, when you had the gavel, the Supreme Court gavel
raising gay from marriage because you talked
about coming up with–>>Darrin Bell: I’ve been drawing
cartoons about gay marriage and equal rights for
gay people since 2000.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Before a lot
of other people were doing it. When I was a cartoonist for my
college paper at UC Berkeley.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Back then, it
wasn’t even popular at UC Berkeley.>>Michael Cavna: Be
a political cartoon.>>Darrin Bell: No, it was [laughs]. That, I mean, I have my own protest. But the issue gave–
it was not popular.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And the more went
on, the more detail my cartoons got. The more I tried to
drive my point home.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And sooner, after
a while, the tides started to turn. And when the Supreme Court,
if I only put an end to it, I thought for a second, I thought
now, I’ve got to do something like really, like the most
beautiful cartoon I’ve ever done.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: It
has to be detailed. It has to fill up the whole space. I have to top everything
because this is it.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: It’s
the finish line.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: But, all I felt
was there is no gay marriage now.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: It’s just marriage.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
that was the cartoon.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, and you and
I talked a couple years ago about, that you need to feel it. Your passion, emotion. Some people say, like don’t
get worked up and you feel like that’s something, that’s
a resource that you’d have that goes into your work.>>Yeah. I usually start with, I don’t start with like
writing down an idea. I usually start just drawing. And whatever I feel,
let that come out. And then I massage
that into a cartoon. I make sure it says the
point logically as well. But if it’s not something
that I’m feeling, I don’t feel like it’s
something worth saying.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah. Very well said. Well, speaking of, The Party
of Small Government [laughs]. Yikes. What were you thinking
when you were drawing this one? [ Laughter ]>>Darrin Bell: Well, it’s just– sometimes, when there’s
something going on that I feel is just
plain disgusting like getting into those issue.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Trying to
legislate those issues.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I try to come up with an image that’s
sort of equally disgusting.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And gets right to
the heart of why it’s disgusting. And that’s the ultimate
hypocrisy I think that –>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: The Party of Small
Government should not be involved in anything like that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah. Well you’re editors with the
Washington Post writers group when you get disgusted– disgusting,
do you– is your editor, you know, what’s your batting average of getting disgusting
cartoons into print or not?>>Darrin Bell: Ninety
nine point nine percent.>>Michael Cavna: All
right, all right.>>Darrin Bell: They’re
behind me almost all the way.>>Michael Cavna: All
right, that’s fantastic.>>Darrin Bell: I’d only– I only
had one or two cartoon spiked.>>Michael Cavna: OK.>>Darrin Bell: And those
all end up on my Facebook.>>Michael Cavna: OK. So flag those or flag this. So you want to tell
us about this one?>>Darrin Bell: Well, coming into
the election, Fox News and the rest of the right wing intelligence
here were trying to talk– trying to reach out to black people.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: They’re trying to advance the theory–
the plantation theory.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Telling us that,
why are you supporting Democrats? They haven’t done anything for you.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And there’s
nothing as belittling and demeaning as telling somebody that they’ve
been supporting the wrong people for the last 50 years because
they don’t know any better.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So that’s
where I came up with.>>Michael Cavna: Insulting
the intelligence of. Yeah. And not completely dissimilar
here about racism and being gone and the tattoos, you can
see the confederate tattoo.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: Wow,
that is disgusting.>>Darrin Bell: That
was during the– now you all remember the
confederate flag was being removed from state houses that
massacred the [inaudible].>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I– they
could remove the symbol.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I want
them to remove the symbol.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: That’s
great, I think it’s– I always thought it was
a symbol of treason. I never understood why people–
why people are proud of it. Because it– the word
was about slavery. But, you can remove the symbol, but it doesn’t really
change anybody’s hearts.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah,
well said very well said. And this is his powerful OK– so
meaning, it’s such a decision. You’re going to show
something is graphic. I talked to Paul Conrad
about this one, so about showing dead
bodies and what do you do? I mean he would draw a
child and board a child on a crucifix, you know, on a cross. So, but tell us about this
you know, and it’s so I see, it can derive still humor from that
conflict between having something as light as balloons and the
bodies, can you talk about this?>>Darrin Bell: Well, that’s another
one of those disgusting things. You have this– You have
this massacre at a college and then you had a candidate
running for president who basically turns himself into
a crown by interjecting himself into it and saying
well, if it had been me, I would have rushed the gunmen. I’m not blaming you guys. Dead people for not doing it,
but I would have done that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, exactly. He’s suddenly like a superhero, like he would have just
handled it perfectly. And then you did this. Darrin Bell: The next
day job– stuff happen.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I think
you lost right there.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, absolutely. So, and you got the
NRA solution here.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah. Well, the day after the– the
massacre at the– at the night club.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Florida.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: People were already
talking about how if– if the– if it hadn’t been a gun free zone.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: If
people have had guns.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And my first
thought was this is a– like almost pitch black room full
of drunk people and strobe lights.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And even the cops–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah, and even– even the cops didn’t want to go because that’s not a good
environment for shooting people.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And so that– that’s not exactly how
it would have turned out.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: If all
these people had been armed.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah,
and then you– you invoked the Little Rascals here?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: So can you
talk about the Hillary hater, the He Man Hillary Haters Club?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah, it says
that the meeting is now in order. First order of business, what
you felt it say if you were to change the name of our club to
the select committee on Benghazi. Well, they– they’ve tried
her seven or eight times–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: —
and never turned– never turned up what
they were looking for.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And it was pretty
obvious I think to everybody who didn’t already despise Clinton–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — that this
was– this was political.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: They–
they were trying, because until Benghazi happened,
they were all praising her. They were saying she is– she is
an excellent bipartisan person who we could work with.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Why can’t the
President be more like her?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And then it became
obvious she was going to run for President so they
have to find some issue that they knew they could
hang around her neck.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — in a couple of
years when the election came around.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah,
yeah, [inaudible].>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: So you got– so
you got the– again, to have fun, I mean a glorious year
with the Trump caricature and to have great fun and
that sort of that scow. But can you talk about this one?>>Darrin Bell: Well, that– that guy really, he
buys his own publicity. He really pumps himself out.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I don’t know if he
took himself seriously at first.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: But
the more he talked and the more the crowds he saw–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: —
the more he bought into his own– his own height.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And he’s– he’s gotten into dangerous
xenophobic demigod territory.>>Michael Cavna: Yes, so
more and more self-inflated.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: As if were–>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: So you get
Bernie voters, Hillary voters–>>Darrin Bell: Yeah, well–>>Michael Cavna: Tipping
the scale here?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah. I– as– as Michael does, I go
after– I go after my own side too.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Because
with what– what I do with– the reason I want to be an editorial
cartoonist is I want to talk about what– what bothers me, what
I think– what I think is wrong.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
what I think– we’re– we’re a better country than– than
what– than what we see out there.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And one of the things I think is wrong
is the system being rigged.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
whether it’s rigged on– on the right or rigged on the left,
we should pay attention to that and we shouldn’t be OK with that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Michael Ramirez: So you’ve become
a Donald Trump supporter then? [ Laughter ]>>Darrin Bell: Well, the
thing– and if you’ll notice, there are more voters
on her side anyway. That’s because she
was wining anyhow.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: He didn’t have–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — the DNC did
not have to step in on her behalf and schedule– schedule the debates
at– at 1 in the morning and–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: When nobody–
when like two people are watching.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: They didn’t
have to do any of that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. Well, you gave [inaudible]
quite a manicure there.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: So
it was– it was good. So, can you talk about the–
your take on the Hand of God?>>Darrin Bell: Well, that’s– that’s one of those things where I
just started drawing what I felt.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: He was talking
about the wall and he was saying for the millionth time, and
I was thinking this is just– that’s not our– our country.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: It’s not
the country I grew up in.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Who is this guy.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Who– where is
he getting his inspiration from, who– who created him?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
then I had [inaudible].>>Michael Cavna: And then it came. Thanks for making him
clothed by the way, in terms of avoiding disgusting–>>Darrin Bell: I–
I didn’t at first.>>Michael Ramirez: Thanks– thanks
for putting that image of mine.>>Michael Cavna: I’m
sorry, I’m just–>>Darrin Bell: I– I added
the suit at the last minute.>>Michael Cavna: Thank you.>>Darrin Bell: You’re welcome.>>Michael Cavna: OK. Donald Trump’s America here.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah. Well, I– I don’t think all
cartoons have to be funny. In fact, I was talking to Michael
earlier about some– we have– one of our favorite comics that we
have in common is Calvin and Hobbes and I was thinking back
to when I was a kid. There was one day when I realize
I don’t think I’ve ever laughed at a Calvin and Hobbes.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Even though
it’s my favorite strip.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Every– what– what I think when I see
this, that’s– that’s true.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: That’s why I loved
it because it made me feel some– identified with it,
I saw truth in it.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So I– I don’t
think humor is necessary– is necessary for every cartoon.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Especially when
it comes to something like that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah. And so you got the gunner blood
acts here for President and another, you know, just that hardcore. When you just use a pop or red, boy, it has such an impact,
so much more impact. Can you talk about this one?>>Darrin Bell: Well, the– the
guy in the audience says, still, I like that he says what he thinks.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
we all know, that’s– that’s what people
say about, you know.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah,
and they use that trick.>>Darrin Bell: But–
but I think it– what I’m trying to get across is
it’s what people think that matters.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: It’s not–
if somebody isn’t a hero, somebody isn’t worthy of a vote–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — just
because they’re honest.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: If they’re
honest about horrible ideas and horrible thoughts about– and
stereotypical thoughts about– about their fellow Americans–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: That’s important.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: You know.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: The
content is important.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. You know, there’s an old idea. It goes back to Frank
Capra films, you know, oh, you like the plain spoken
American or the honest American, but then what’s behind
that, you know.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: So speaking of–>>Michael Ramirez: And I like
gunner blood acts by the way.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah [laughs].>>Michael Ramirez: I was
an early supporter of it.>>Michael Cavna: You were? The– so can you talk about the–
about what’s malignant here?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah, well,
there is– there is a growth on–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. [ Inaudible Remark ]>>Darrin Bell: He’s in trouble.>>Michael Cavna: Wow,
he looks so sad. I mean really sad.>>Darrin Bell: Well, he doesn’t–
he doesn’t want to have it.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: He’s stuck with it.>>Michael Cavna: He’s
stuck, he’s stuck.>>Michael Ramirez: I’m just
glad it wasn’t a colonoscopy.>>Michael Cavna: I’m glad you
didn’t say colon Paula-oscopy [phonetic] there. So you got to raise again
with the noses and again, you’re going with both
of them lying.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: But you’re
putting them in opposition.>>Michael Ramirez:
This– this gives back to– to what you’re saying earlier.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Am I
going to go with Trump?>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: No, because
I mean– he– she lies.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: He– she– he is
in a whole different lead from her.>>Michael Cavna: He’s
in a class by himself?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah
class by himself.>>Michael Cavna: OK.>>Darrin Bell: And– but
this is me being optimistic.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: This is me thinking
Americans are going to be fed up with lies eventually and
whoever lies first is going to– whoever lies the worst–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — is
going to be finished.>>Michael Cavna: OK. So you’re– you’re saying
Gary Johnson is going to win?>>Darrin Bell: Jill, Jill Stein.>>Michael Ramirez: Jill.>>Michael Cavna: Jill Stein, OK. And can you talk about this– this
with each one, the split balloon?>>Darrin Bell: Yeah. Well, I– every chance I get, I
try– I try to be even had to– here, this was when
the FBI announced that they were not
going to indict Clinton.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: But at
the same time, it seem– they seemed to make a
case for an indictment.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And the Republicans
ceased on the case they made for the indictment and the Democrats
ceased on the fact that she– there was nothing they could prove.>>Michael Ramirez: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So, that’s a
literal representation of–>>Michael Cavna: Of the wording.>>Darrin Bell: — of them
looking at the same sentence.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And saying two
completely different things.>>Michael Cavna: Same
two sides, you got Trump and you got the hair
[inaudible] here.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: The only thing we
have to fear is Muslims and Mexicans and China and Hillary and people
who are upset about police brutality and then the NATO members
and on and on and on. You know, we should– I did want
to quickly get to, you know, you and I have talked in
interviews about police brutality and you’ve talked about
your mom gave– made sure when you were a
boy that you lose a toy gun that was a translucent
toy gun, that it was clear that it wasn’t a solid
toy gun, that, you know, we talked about having a
conversation, when we– and you– you have, you know, you
have a couple of children. I know you have a baby. The– So you know, you
talked about police brutality and then [inaudible]
with everything. I mean that– that comes up
that you must feel passionate in your current cartoons because
as a reader, something comes to it.>>Darrin Bell: Well,
I– I could have– I was an editorial
cartoonist in the ’90s. I was a freelancer and I quit after
9/11 to focus on my comic strips.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I– I
just did not want to do it. I was happy. I was happy not having to
watch the news everyday and creating my own little universe and ignoring this one
when it got too bad.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: But then
Trayvon Martin got shot.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And that whole
thing– the country divided into–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — and half the
country was saying he deserved it.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And it
was so just dehumanizing.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I thought, and
when Zimmerman was acquitted, I wrote a week of strips where
he accompanies Trayvon Martin through the afterlife.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, and we
should say this is in Candorville.>>Darrin Bell: Yeah.>>Michael Cavna: It was–
it was a great series.>>Darrin Bell: And by the
end of it, I realized I– I had to leave out most
of what I wanted to say because this is still a comic strip.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I realized I
could have said all these stuff on the editorial page.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So, next opportunity
I got, I asked my editor, “Are you still interested in
me doing editorial cartoons?”>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
she said, “of course.”>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So–>>Michael Cavna: And there you go.>>Darrin Bell: So I– I– but
it goes back to when I was a kid. I– I could have been Tamir Rice–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: —
because of that gun.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: My– My mom, she
didn’t tell me why but she told me that I couldn’t play with the
same toy guns my other friends played with. She said I had to play with this
bright green ugly translucent water gun.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And so I did,
and so I was walking to– I was walking to a corner store
one day, snuck out of the house, I was too young to leave
by myself but I wanted to go get a comic book
and play [inaudible].>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Darrin Bell: So, I was– I was there with my gun and
I was shooting the bench, I was shooting the stop
sign and everything because there were Stormtroopers
in the sky, and I was Hans Solo.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I knelt down to
fill up the gun from the puddle–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And there
was a shadow and I looked up and it was a police officer.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And
he had his gun out.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Darrin Bell: And he said that–
he asked what I was doing there, he asked where I live, he
said they had some complaints. He took my gun from me–>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Darrin Bell: And then he went–>>Michael Ramirez: That’s
why you’re really mad, is it?>>Darrin Bell: Well–>>Michael Ramirez:
I’m just kidding. I’m just kidding.>>Darrin Bell: But
if it had been instead of bright green translucent–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: — plastic–>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: I might
not be here right now.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I was
just being a regular kid.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So this is– this
is important to me especially now that I have a son who is
almost 3 and I look at him and I’m thinking what am I going
to have to talk to him about this.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: We–
we’ve been with– whenever people bring guns
to the park, we take him home and take him somewhere else
because I don’t want him to want to play with them.>>Michael Cavna: Wow.>>Darrin Bell: So, I don’t know
how to do an awful lot of things.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: But I know
how to be a cartoonist.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And every time
I sit down to draw a cartoon, every time something like this
happens where some innocent– innocent person, Black,
White, whatever, is shot by the police,
I think about my son.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: And I think I need
to make the world better for him.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: The only
way I know how to do it is to keep talking about it.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: So
that’s– that’s what I do.>>Michael Cavna: Yes. Well, I wish we have time. Well said– [ Applause ] Well said, quickly, can I– I should
probably jump ahead to this one. You’ve drawn Trump there
as the Lincoln Memorial, you had a house divided and– and then Trump with
outreach in a whack, right?>>Darrin Bell: Mm-hmm.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, and– and– oh, Hillary, well this one
caught my– Hillary with candor, penicillin, you know, with the
pneumonia news with the pneumonia, even had candor, I
thought that was powerful. And then like we talked about being
killed because of their color, you’re willing to also brought by
the police when they’re, you know, were on the– were only
targeted, and it’s OK. Let’s just say we feared
for our lives.>>Darrin Bell: 2015
was a bad year for that.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah, wow, wow. We’re– we need to wrap up. So let me just ask each of
you guys, as cartoonist, not as American citizens but
as good American cartoonists, you don’t just say who you’re– who
you’re voting for or who you want but are there certain aspects
of each candidate that getting in to the new year, you
just sort of salivate. Is there satirical red
meat on the horizon?>>Darrin Bell: Well, I’ll
just say the obvious one. Both of them have trouble
with the truth.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: Neither one
of them is straightforward.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah.>>Darrin Bell: They’re– They’re both hiding things
that we deserve to know.>>Michael Cavna: Yeah. So there will be material
no matter–>>Michael Ramirez: You know, I have
to say as a political cartoonist, I’m voting for both of them.>>Michael Cavna: Wow, OK, yeah. OK.>>Michael Ramirez: One’s in
California and one is in Chicago.>>Michael Cavna: OK. Yo might– you could do two in
Chicago into a price of one. Well, thank you guys because you
enlightened, you make us laugh, and at the same time we’re informed
because you guys do true journalism. A big hand please for Michael
Ramirez and Darrin Bell. [ Applause ] Thank you guys.>>Darrin Bell: Thank you.>>This has been a presentation
of the Library of Congress. Visit us at loc.gov.

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