Chris Philp – BBC Sunday Politics – Housing and Public Transport Numbers

Chris Philp – BBC Sunday Politics – Housing and Public Transport Numbers


in densities gonna be a problem for both
of you and your constituents isn’t it people in suburbs don’t particularly
want to live in high-density areas well I’m building on people’s back gardens as
the plan suggests is definitely not a good idea but what London really needs
is action not words we’ve had a lot of words from politicians what we need a
more homes being built and we saw in that film a couple of examples there the
one in Enfield for instance where a developer in that case Barrett homes was
poised to build thousands of thousands of units on a brownfield site as the
Mayor of London says he wants but they pulled out because the affordable
housing target was too high and it was financially not viable now I know I
fully accept the need to build affordable housing but the way you make
housing affordable is to build more of it under Sadiq Khan housing starts have
gone down by 23 percent compared to Boris Johnson’s last year and even worse
Housing Association and council housing starts have gone down 21 really clear on
the screen to be clear in a few things there firstly and building on gardens as
you I’m sure you probably know people are always allowed to bring forward
planning applications for gardens that they own what we’re saying in the long
term plan is if people bring forward those applications we want the green to
be reprimanded by and crucially we want more homes to be built so that more
Londoners can benefit from the development that happens now I really
think one of the crucial points to say here Chris is that you know you’re part
of a government who talks about building more housing but the first time we met
you lobbied me to stop a development around London like the one in Enfield
there’s that has fallen over on your watch like Croydon town centre like old
Oh common what’s happening with that like Barking Riverside that we should
bring forward instead of in appropriate areas like the one that you refer to
just then Chris you know talks a good game here but what James has just
alluded to is that politicians have to stand up and be counted on this issue
and you know there is a tendency to say not at the end of my Road not in my back
garden London needs more homes if you just let me finish if you just let me
finish one second Chris I think you talk about people
need in action and not words what we need is action from government when I
first became an MP in 2010 the first act of the coalition government was to cut
the National affordable house building program by 63% anything that Theresa May
is announced in the last year or so is playing at the edges of this problem we
saw a budget where the Chancellor was pussyfooting around we’re saying we’re
going to do a review into planning permissions we need real investment and
we need investment on a large scale we need five times as much investment in
genuinely affordable homes than is going in space I’d like to bring and your
Denison on this Andrew you saw in the film there it’s the Silver Bullet would
be building on the Greenbelt we’re not short of space there’s masses of
brownfield land which can be built on one of the big challenge is not easy to
build on is that well it needs a key requirement you need to go to get suits
and one of the big challenges we face in large parts of London is poor
connectivity it’s no accident that what’s driving the development of
Barking Riverside now is the extension of the London Overground
it’s spent ten years being a desert that site I mean I’ve been there you go –
barking and they have to catch a bus and it’s 20 minutes it could be half an hour
in the rush hour of course people won’t live there if you can’t get to work
once it’s two stops from barking on the overground with direct links all the way
across London which you’ll get that place will be transformed and across the
parties we’ve realised that over the last ten years cross rail is opening
next year the Elizabeth line that will transform housing densities in the
stations around there were plans now which the mayor has taken forward which
the government is supporting for cross well – which will be the new north-south
line in London that could itself unlock 200,000 homes most of them on brownfield
sites but which at the moment are very hard to get so fine
very quickly James briefly if you will this accusation that you are going to
ruin the suburbs that it affects this is you know there’s this whole plan is anti
suburbs there’s an emphasis in the plan on good design and that’s whether you’re
building in the suburbs or in central or inner London right across London we want
to see well-designed higher density housing but
we’re very clear that everywhere in London need to play a part and that
includes even places in Chris’s constituency where he needs to get with
the program and start building more housing rather than blocking
developments where we can get more homes for Londoners alright we have to leave
it there I’m afraid I know you’d like to come back in
thank you James thanks James Mary for joining us now I’m sorry to bring it up
on what is a day off for most but picture the morning commute as you
squeeze into a bus or a force to nestle into some stranger’s armpit on the train
you’ve probably come to an obvious conclusion more and more people seem to
be using public transport actually according to the stats you’re wrong
Hisle well I was a bit surprised because on on southern trains to Croydon out on
the tubes it still feels pretty crowded so I was really surprised to see those
those figures and I think andrew is right the RMT strikes think it’s 40 days
of strikes on southern has had a crippling effect on Croydon residents
and residents up and down the Brighton mainline that would have contributed and
but I think also to be honest you know Sadiq Khan promised during the mayoral
election that not a single Londoner would pay a penny more in 2020 but in
fact he’s put up fares contry to his promise on travel cards I’m going to
hand back to Sarah

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