08/22/17 DigiRef Academy Politics and Government Participating in YOUR Democracy

08/22/17 DigiRef Academy Politics and Government Participating in YOUR Democracy


Rollins: Okay. So I just started out saying
I’m so grateful to be here today to talk to you about
politics and government because it’s something
that affects our daily lives, and also the lives
of our patrons. And it’s so overwhelming
sometimes to find sites for them that can help them, you know, become more
literate about politics, about our government,
about voting. And so today I want to show you
how to, first of all, communicate that
in a digital environment because, let’s face it, a lot of
our users connect with us digitally over chat. Some of them don’t come in
to the library as much as they used to, or if they do come in to the
library, how can we help them? It all works. What I’m going to
show you today, it all works together
for both situations. So, you know, it’s really hard
to become literate about this topic because it changes so quickly, and, you know,
trying to find the resources to support answering
these questions. So today we’re just going
to talk a little bit about basic terminology. This is not going to be
a government class. I promise. Why we should focus
on politics and government. Why does it matter to us
and our patrons. How should we provide
this information? And then, what are some
typical questions? For instance, one of the things
I like to do if I do this in person is cut up all the questions on
to little slips of paper, and what I do is I kind of call
it final jeopardy where one person
is the librarian and one person is the patron, and you actually just go
into a chat environment and you try
to answer the question. That’s the absolute
best practice, and I actually do that on line
with my students when I teach this class,
Digital Reference. So something to think about. So how can we become effective with political and government
digital reference? We’re going to talk and spend
a quite a bit of time on how you can be effective
at chatting on this topic. We’ll talk a little bit about
the digital reference cycle. Of course, you know,
where would we be without the reference interview,
and, you know, it’s so important to be able
to do this effectively. And in 22 years, you know,
I think, you know, I’ve become great at it, but depending on the question sometimes
I still struggle as well. And what kind of ways…
what kind of things can you do to help yourself when you
struggle with these questions. And then we’ll move
to the types of resources. This is a huge topic
and I have a lot of sources, and we’re not going to
go into them deeply, but my strategy for you
is to expose you to these because if you’re like me, you know,
until I made this presentation, I didn’t have a lot of time,
obviously, to look at all these sites
all the time. So I want you to have
these resources, you know, pick the ones
that speak most to you that are going to help most
to your patrons, and keep those kind of
in your back pocket or in a cheat sheet
or, you know, maybe in a LibGuide
or something like that. That’s kind of
the strategy for this. So that’s our agenda today. So let’s get started with
some basic terminology. So just to review in case
it’s been a long time since you’ve had
your government class, and it’s been ages for me… So what do we mean by
government politics and policy. So government is actually
kind of the mechanism. So you think about the
institutions like Congress. You think about the people. What are the rules, you know, what governing documents
do we have? What’s the structure? And then you talk
about the politics, and this is where it can
get messy sometimes. This is the process,
the negotiations, the give-and-take, the
compromise, what people believe. It’s everything, right? And then also the policy. These are the laws
that we are subjected to. Subjected to sounds
kind of scary but, you know, this is
the result of the process. It’s the procedure
and it involves values. So just a very quick review of
what we’re talking about today. So why do politics matter? And I would like,
if you have a second, please in the chat box type why you think politics
and government are important. This should be really
obvious to you. Let me see if I can change
my volume a little bit here. Is that better? Absolutely, John. It affects our lives.
Yeah. It’s what we can and can’t do. It affects environment,
business, health, taxes, spending, and people feel
very passionate about it. Oh, it’s still not loud enough. Give me just a second. Sorry about that. Is that better? Okay.
Thank you. Sorry, there must be an
adjustment somewhere I missed. So I really like this. This is just something I found on the Internet
by John Garrecht, and he talks about, you know,
why do we argue about politics? You know, sex, drugs, rock
and roll, politics, religion… Why do we argue
about these things? And it’s because
it really matters. These are things
that matter to us. And like someone said,
you can’t complain if you don’t participate. But I think it can be
overwhelming to our patrons to participate if we don’t know
what is going on, if we don’t know
what is fact or fiction. You know, and how can you get
to some of the ways to figure that out? How can you figure out
what is going on? And it’s a struggle for me
as well sometimes to figure out, well, what does that
candidate believe? What are they actually going
to do if they get into office? Those kinds of things.
Okay. So where do we come in? And so we talked earlier
a little bit about, you know, the government, politics, policy
and what those things are. And those are linked by,
of course, things like elections, political parties,
of course the media. You know, public opinion,
interest groups. And so where do
librarians come in? And we’re kind of that linkage
between the people and the media
between the elections. And so that’s our role is to
kind of try to help our patrons become more literate
about the issues, where they need to vote, all
those different kinds of things. And so that’s kind of
where we come in. So one of the things
that can help you provide better political and government
services and information is to actually know
your community. Know what kind of people
are in your community. What’s their education level? Also, one of the things to think
about is how much you know about the topic, how much you know about
what resources you have, or what resources
you have available to you, whether it’s
a subscription service through the Florida
Electronic Library, or it’s things that
are out there for free that can help your patrons. And then your personal
evaluation as a librarian. Evaluating these sources, thinking about
what’s best for your patrons. And then of course that falls
into how do you communicate these sources? How do you teach your patrons
these resources that are going to help them
make decisions about the things that matter most in their life? How do you help them become
literate about these services and this technology? And that’s just something
to think about. One of the sources
that I love to go to, and you guys probably
have been to before, is the American FactFinder. And this will give you
some baselines on, you know, education in your community, so you know kind of how
you can tailor your resources and what kind of services
and instruction you provide on this
type of topic. It’ll also give you poverty,
age, you know, all those demographics that would help you
form a picture of how you might tailor
your services to the people in your community. So these are some questions. This is just kind of, you know,
some typical questions you might get
on government and politics as far as reference questions. And after all,
this is a DigiRef, you know, session theme type thing. So these are questions
you might get on line. And if you look really quickly,
have any of you, you can just type
in the chat box yes or no, have any of you ever gotten
these type of questions, either in person
or over digital chat? Okay. Laurie, which one…
You can just put a number. Which one did you get? Government spending. Okay.
Great. Okay.
Perfect. And so this is just kind of
a sample set of questions, and I’m going to tell you
about some homework at the end, if you choose to do it. I think it’s kind of the best
way to get really good at some of these questions. So here’s just a few more
just to kind of, you know… Some of them are more, like,
college libraries. Some of them are, you know,
basically public library, you know, different
things like that. So these are some
of the questions that you might possibly get. Number 12 all the time, yes. Absolutely.
Okay. So just kind of, you know, and
so you’re practiced at that one. Great. So how can we become effective? And this is kind of moving more into the digital
reference portion. And part of the session is going
to focus heavily on resources, but it’s all fine and good
if you have these resources but you don’t know
how to communicate them to your patrons. So one of the ways that you can
make your patrons happy is to have these, you know, fantastic
digital reference skills which focuses heavily
on the reference interview, to have great technical
and communication skills and then also to have
the knowledge of the politics
and government resources. So if you get
that question about, “What programs do I qualify? Where do I vote?
Who’s my senator?” All those kinds of things,
then you have these resources and the skills to make
your patrons happy. So we’re going to spend
a lot of time on the digital reference skill, but what do I mean
by technical skills? And I’m just going to go
through this pretty quickly. And so those are things like,
you know, making sure you know
how to access the Internet. Do you know how to send a file? Do you know how to use the chat
software that your library uses? Have you practiced in it? Can you send e-mails? You know, different
things like that. Really basic technical skills. Communication skills are
a little bit different. They are, like, you know, more of applying
your digital reference skills, like when to communicate, how, why, and when to use
those reference skills. It’s the ability. The communication focuses
on the ability to empathize with your users. How to explain the process
without using library jargon. You know, how to show
a professional persona and project, you know, the library community
as a library space. And also, very important
to any kind of interaction with your patrons, but especially things like
religion, medical, government is to not make value judgments. And I know it’s hard, you know,
for instance if you don’t like Trump and they are a pro-Trump person and they’re asking questions
about Trump, it’s kind of hard
not to make value judgments and, you know, put your
personal opinion in there. But we, of course you guys know, have to avoid
making value judgments and focus on the information
and remain objective. And sometimes that can be hard, but that’s just some of the
things about communication. Also avoiding silence. You know, if you’ve been away
for awhile when you’ve been chatting, you always want
to update the user on where you are
in your process. You know, “I’ll be back
in 2 minutes,” you know. And also kind of
with communication, where to follow up. How they can get back with you
if you weren’t able to answer their question in time, or, you know,
you did answer their question, but they might need more help. Follow-up is huge. So as far as reference skills,
you know, things like how to be
approachable, maintain a welcoming
and enthusiastic service attitude throughout this
text-based process, right, because they can’t see us. They don’t know
if we’re smiling. They don’t know if we’re angry. You know, and when all you
have is the words, it’s sometimes hard to convey that emotion that
you’re being helpful. Of course, you know, knowing
your sources, that’s huge. Also the reference interview, and we’re going to talk
a little bit more about that. You know, and also with
the reference skills is thinking about, you know, where your patron
is coming from. Can they use the Florida
Electronic Library, or are they in Georgia? You know, what are
the limitations that you have
with your resources, and can you point
them to resources? Okay. So this is kind of
what I think of as the effective
digital reference cycle. And this is just kind of
something that I made, and it’s not in a book anywhere. This is just
Stephanie Rollins’ view of how to make digital
reference effective. So one of the first things
you want to do is, you know, kind of look at your technical
and communication skills and kind of assess yourself. Where are you lacking? Do you need practice
with the chat software? You know, do you need to know about these political and
government resources? Where — What are
your weaknesses? And then refine those skills. And then what you want to do is have a skilled
reference interview. Again, we’re going to talk
a little bit more about that, which also includes a chat flow. So, once you get good
with digital reference, you’ll kind of notice
that you have a flow for it. You know how to reconnect
with a user if you’ve been away
for a couple minutes. You know how to…
what questions to ask. And we’re going to focus
a little bit on what I call the flow
in a couple minutes. And scripting can be huge
with that, whether it’s something built in to your chat software,
or it’s, you know, a Word document where
you’ve got little snippets that you can cut
and paste for things that you are going to
type all the time. Of course, it’s picking
the right resources to answer the question. It includes
searching effectively, and it includes our skills
of being able to evaluate the most effective and best resources
for our customers. So that’s just kind of a little
bit about what I think of as the effective
digital reference cycle. So this is something
for you guys if you do chats. This is what I use in my class,
and after class, I make the students, you know, fill this out after they’ve
partnered up on a question, and I know it’s difficult
to see here. The link is at the bottom. But, after you do a chat, these are some questions
you can ask yourselves. This is, again, part of what
I think is an effective chat. It goes from best to worst. So, for instance,
a personal greeting was sent. You know, reference
question is clarified. So there’s some tips here about
what makes really good chats, and you guys can come back
and look at that, but, if you decide
to do the homework, you can actually come here
and fill out this form and get some, you know,
feedback on each other. So what is a reference
interview? We all know this,
but it just bears just kind of
refreshing it again. So it’s kind of this
interpersonal communication that’s between a reference
library and a library user to determine
kind of what they need, which, as you know, may turn out to be
completely different from the question
they initially asked. It can be in person, phone,
electronically, e-mail, you know, again,
it can be chat, and a well trained
reference librarian can initiate conversations
sometimes, you know, if that person has anxiety
about asking their question. So here’s some of
the best practices, and we talked
a little bit about this when I was talking about
your communication skills. Of course you want to be
approachable and welcoming. You want to show interest,
and these are things you do throughout the chat, and there’s ways
to phrase things that I’m going to talk to you
about in a little bit. Of course, we want
to pay attention. That goes without saying. To me, the heart of
the reference interview is clarifying and verifying the person’s
question by paraphrasing or asking open-ended
questions as needed. You want to formulate
a search strategy, and, in order to kind of instructor
and educate our users, you want to share it with them so they can take it back at a
later date and do it themselves. You want to follow up. You know, “Is this
what you need?” The user’s satisfaction, and then you want to formally
conclude the interview because sometimes
you’re just sitting there, and they’re just sitting there, and somebody needs
to initiate a closing. So sorry. So here’s some of the…
This is one, in my 22 years, I found to be
one of the best processes for the reference interview, and I call if reference
interview Zen, and this is from Tychkoson. A few years ago, even though
I’ve been a reference librarian for quite some time, I’m always trying
to improve my skills and see what else
I can do better and what I can learn about,
you know, reference. I’ve done reference forever. You know, what am I missing?
What can I do better? And so I took this class,
and it focused on Tychkoson and his four Rs
of the reference interview. And you guys know, we’ve heard
about the three Rs, the writing, reading and arithmetic
in school. Well, this is the four
Rs of the reference interview, and so it’s kind of a mnemonic as you’re doing your chat
to kind of keep in mind, and if you follow the four Rs,
you’re most likely to succeed, and your patrons
are more likely to return. So here’s the four Rs. So you want to
reassure your user. You want to respond. You want to reflect,
and you want to repeat. So, if you’ve ever seen
“Karate Kid,” it’s kind of like “Wax on, wax off.” You might be too young
for “Karate Kid.” But this is kind of the process
to keep in mind, and it could be
a ton more complicated. I’ve seen a bunch of reference
books that, you know, have, like, 20 steps. But, to sum it up,
this speaks to me, and hopefully it speaks
to you as well. So reassure: The first thing
you want to do is reassure your patron. I mean, they took the time
to come to the chat window and ask their question, and so they’ve probably
searched Google. They’ve probably done quite
a bit before they’ve come to you a lot of times,
not always, but sometimes. So you want to reassure them
that their question is important. You know, there’s this huge
psychological barrier sometimes for people
asking for help, and so, before we even
address the question, we need to reassure them and let them know that
their question is important. You know, “Yes, I can help you,” or “We’ve got a ton
of information on that,” or “I know we can discover
something together,” something positive. So respond: So,
once you’ve reassured, you want to actually
let them know that you’ve
gotten their question, but, as we said earlier, they rarely ask for
what they really want. So we want to use our reference
interview skills to find out. So open-ended questions,
we can get them to expand upon the request, and closed-ended questions,
we’ll refine the details, and this is kind of the part
that takes the most time, and I’m going to talk
a little bit more about this, so, if you don’t… Some students in my class didn’t know
what an open-ended question was, and they didn’t know what
a closed-ended question was, which I thought
was pretty simple, but so I’m going to state
the obvious to you as well. So the thing about this is,
if you are good at it, it will save the patron time, and it will also save you time
without having to ask, you know, getting involved
in the search strategy and then them saying, “Oh, that’s not what
I really wanted.” So, if you can narrow down
their question, it’s only going to help you get
them the sources that they need. So, when I talk about open-
and closed-ended questions, basically you’re
beginning a dialogue. So, again, we have patrons
that are embarrassed because they’re asking for help, so we want to make
our patrons feel comfortable in this dialogue,
in this give-and-take. So, you know, again,
somebody says, you know, “Where are the
newspapers online?” And that’s not really
what they wanted. They actually wanted, you know,
an article on Trump, you know, and they
didn’t ask you that. They just knew that it was
going to be in a newspaper. So you want to make sure
you begin a dialogue that can help them get the
information they actually want, even if they don’t know
how to ask that question. So it’s about how to ask. So this is kind of… An open-ended question,
just to sum it up, is going to help you get more
information from the patron. So, for instance,
“Where have you looked so far?” And they may say, “Google”
or, you know, “I’ve looked at a newspaper.” So “What kind of material
would you expect to find on this topic?” “How much would you
like to find?” Or, you know,
“Tell me more about that.” My sons, you know, for instance, I wouldn’t say,
“Did you have a good day?” because they’d say “Yes”
or “No.” I would say, “What was
your favorite part of today? What was hard about today?” you know, “Who did you talk
to today? What did they say?” And those are more open-ended
questions, you know, because, with teenage boys, they’re going to give you
a yes-or-no answer. So those are just things
to think about, and maybe that’s oversimplified,
but just to give you the idea. Now closed-ended questions… And, when I do
digital reference, I kind of alternate these,
you know, back and forth to get to whatever the question
actually is that they’re asking. So these are more yes-or-no
questions, like, “Have you looked in
the library catalogue? Do you want books or articles? Do you want current
or historical information?” And then, near the end,
a closed-ended question that could be part
of your closing is, “Is this what you want?
Am I on the right track?” Those are more
closed-ended-type questions. Also, one of the things
that I didn’t consider when I first started doing
digital reference was, you want to make sure
that you’re neutral in tone. So a neutral question, just to
give you an example, would be, “How do you plan to use
that information?” as opposed to “What do you
need that for?” which sounds very
confrontational almost, and one of the things
I stress to my students is, “Don’t do can.
Use the word would.” “Can you tell me more
about your topic?” just does not have
the same tone. And I know it’s just typing. Would sounds more polite,
more approachable. I also tell them, “Don’t use
the word okay a lot because it just sounds, you
know, flippish kind of thing,” and so there’s ways
to be neutral, and you just want to think
about, even in words, and whoever has sent
a text message, you guys know, if sometimes you use
the wrong word, it’s going to come across wrong. So just things to think
about your phrasing. Okay, so, once you think
you know, remember, you think you know what
the patron is asking for, you actually want to paraphrase and state the question
back to the patron, and this is part
of the reflecting. That way, they can hear it,
and this also gives the patron to hear what they’re asking
about in a more structured way, and sometimes,
once they hear the question, they’ll give you more details. They may modify it, so one of
the things I teach my students is, you know, just come up with
something that works for you, but, “So if I understand
correctly, you are looking for…” and then you kind of summarize
what they’re asking. So that’s part of the reflect. And then repeat: Sometimes,
you may have to, you know, reflect also includes
the resources. And then you want to repeat,
so you start, you know, again,
reassures the patron. So, once you’ve restated their
question, you reassure them, “Oh, yeah, we could find a ton
of information about this.” And, again, you may
want to refine using open-ended questions, closed-ended questions. Sometimes this part takes
a little bit more time. So what does this look like? And so this is kind of
a scripted chat just to give you the idea of when I showed you
that little form that will help you
evaluate your chats, this is kind of step-by-step
some of the things that you might do in
your actual chat process. So of course you want to have
a welcoming greeting. So what I do is, I always,
if the person gives their name, I always start with their name because this is
an impersonal environment, and then I always say my name so
it doesn’t sound so automated, and ask them how can
I help them today. And this person, you know,
of course gives a really, really broad question: “I want to know about the issues
in our upcoming election so I know how to vote.” Huge, right?
Huge question. So, again, you want
to acknowledge the patron, you know,
and you want to reassure them. So I’d say, you know,
“That’s an interesting topic.” And what I did here is,
I asked an open-ended question: “What kind of information on
the issues are you looking for?” And the patron, Sam, says,
“I need information on how the candidates
feel about the issues.” Well, that’s great,
but that’s still, you know, kind of too broad. So, again, this is kind of
the respond section, where you’re trying to figure
out what they’re asking. And, again, “We have a lot of
information on campaign issues. Is there a specific issue
or candidate you’re seeking?” So that’s more of
a closed-ended question, but it’s still
reassuring the person they’ve come to
the right place for help. And so the patron says,
“Well, I want something on Clinton and Trump
on healthcare, but I don’t know
where to start.” And the librarian again reassures them: “I know how
that can be overwhelming,” but again ask another
closed-ended question, “Books, articles or websites?” And the patron says, “Anything!
Anything would be great. And I just want, you know, information that can
answer my question.” And so here again is part
of the process where you’re restating
their question: “So you want to
find resources on how both Clinton
and Trump view the issue of military spending,” or whatever it is
that they say. And, “Yes, that’s it,”
the patron says. And one of the things
I also do in my chat is, I make sure how much
time they have because a person is
not in front of you. You can’t red their body
language if they’re in a hurry. Another thing
with digital chat is, sometimes you can get cut off. So, before I even start
answering their question, I ask, you know, “How much time
do you have available today? And I want to be sure I can
completely answer your question. If we get disconnected,
here’s me e-mail.” And then, that way, it, you
know, reassures the person that, if they’re disconnected
or if they run out of time, there’s still going
to be somebody here that they can follow up with
and answer the question. And, of course,
this person says, “I use the Lee County
Public Library, and I have plenty of time,” which is usually not
always the case, right? So one of the things, you know, as far as resources is,
you know, “I know just where
we can find information on a candidate’s view
of the issues. Let’s start with this site.” And I didn’t list this site
in the resources, but it may be one
that you want to check out. But this site is nonpartisan. It’s not Republican
or Democrat or whatever, Tea Party,
whatever it might be… “And let’s search for the terms,
‘presidential candidate views.'” And so you’ve given the patron
the search terms you’ve used. You’ve given them a site,
and I also give them a link whether
I’ve searched Google… And I always say, “This is a
Google-specific search tailored to what you need. It’s not just, you know,
an open Google search.” And I said, “Here’s a link
to the search.” So take a look,
and I’ll keep looking. I promise I’ll be back
to check out you in 2 minutes.” And so you’ve assured the patron
what you can do to help them, and then you have time
to keep looking. My students term this “giving
them something to chew on” while you’re looking. So you’ve given them a start. It may be all that they need, but you can keep looking
and come back in 2 minutes. And the patron says, “Yes,
this is on the right track.” And then you kind of go back
and forth depending, again, this is a judgement call, on
how much that patron might need. And, again, you want to kind
of work towards your closing. You know, “Do you feel you have
enough resources to get started?” And that’s my strategy for chat. It’s not an exhaustive
answer to the question. It’s not a bibliography
of everything under the Sun out there that’s
going to help them. To me, chat should be about
three to four sources to get them started, and then they can follow up
with you again later. Or you can follow up with them
with a more detailed e-mail, you know, whatever it might be. So the patron says, “Yes,
thank you. That’s great.” And then you want
to begin closing, and I always want to close
the way I opened with, yeah a “Thank you. Again, my name is Stephanie.
Here’s my contact information.” Use their name to make it
more personal. And then you kind of
close the chat. So any questions about that? Does that seem pretty much
what you guys do? Did you pick up any tips,
or is it pretty general? You can type in the chat box. Great, great.
I’m glad it’s helpful. And, again, this is what
I talk about the flow, and a lot of the flow
has to do with the scripting, and, like I said, whether
your chat software has, you know, a little bit
of scripting built in, or you have something
like a Word document that you have on the side,
you can — Great, Amy. And I’ll tell you one more tip
in just a second. So, with scripting, you know, you’re always going
to have a greeting. You’re always going
to have a closing. You’re always probably
going to say, you know, “I’ll be back in 2 minutes.” You’re always going to say, “How
much time do you have today?” So those things you can
actually, you know, kind of script and keep to the side. You know, but like I said,
I would focus on including personal information. Maybe put an X
in your little script, and that X would be
the person’s name, so that way it makes it more
personal, not so automated. Another thing is, there is
a search engine for LibGuides, so you can actually send
a person to a LibGuide, provided it’s, you know,
stuff that’s free and not subscription databases
that you don’t have. Okay, great. Thanks.
Okay. So now we’re going to focus
more on the resources. So, like I said, you’ve got
the huge, huge important reference interview,
the four Rs. You know, you make sure
your patron is reassured, and then you’ve got
to focus on the resources. So, in terms of politics
and government, there’s going to be
a lot of resources, and it may be
overwhelming for you. Again, I want you
to pick the ones that you think would fit
your collection and what you get
asked about the most. Maybe keep a little cheat sheet. You’re going to have a copy
of this presentation. You can print it out. You can, you know,
copy and paste the websites. Tailor it to what you need. This is just for you. It is going to be
a lot of information. But I did want to start with
The Florida Electronic Library and then also move
to some general databases. Because with politics
and government, sometimes that involves history. It can be a very
general question. Also, some federal government
information websites, sites on election and voting,
political parties. Of course, where would we be
without the constitution and other important
founding documents? How to find free books
and free articles. So some of this is
going to be, you know, things that we obviously
have to pay for. But also, there’s some sites
out there that are free that the government provides. You know, that are super helpful
to answer some of those, like, typical questions that I showed you kind of
in the beginning. So one of the things that
I don’t often think about, I’m in Alabama. And we have the Alabama
Virtual Library where we have a ton of databases that anybody in the state can use for free,
so, similar to Florida. But just in case
you haven’t been to the Florida Electronic Library lately, I just want to talk to you
about a couple of databases that I think would be helpful. So, again, there’s some,
you know, general databases, like Academic OneFile. This has got peer-reviewed,
full-tech scholarly content. So if they’re asking
a question about, you know, political parties
or lobbying, this might be
a great place to go. Also, Expanded Academic ASAP,
General OneFile, these are general databases. But, again, you know, they’re paid for through
the state of Florida. So you have access to them
at your libraries. Also, a little bit more specific might be the criminal
justice collection because there is some
overlaps with politics and government
with law obviously. How laws are made,
different things like that. And there may be some things
that, you know, law enforcement, security terrorism. That’s all kind of related
to government. Also, the military
and intelligence database, this is some that we use
heavily where I work. I’m a military librarian
as well. And so, you know,
how does the military play into the support of government
of peace and terrorism? Those are things —
questions that people ask. Obviously, the Civil War might
be something that would, you know, how did that lead
to what we have today? And history is what came before. How is that important
to government? Also, War on Terrorism. And then, at the bottom — it
looks like I cut my slide off — sorry about that —
or my computer won’t show it to me — is the World History Collection. So there may be some things
in there about how our government was formed. So just, yeah, think about
the Florida Electronic Library as a place to go
that might help answer some of those questions
that you get. So some more general library
databases that might be helpful, and these are primarily
from EBSCO as opposed to Gale. And you may have some
of these in your library. Same kind of things when you
think about general questions. Of course, academic search, that’s what we have
at our library that has a tremendous amount
of military, government, politics in there. Opposing Viewpoints
In Context also is great because it looks
at different issues kind of at a probably pro con
basis. So if you were looking for
something on government spending or, you know,
kind of the pros and cons, or if you’re looking for topics like candidates feel about abortion. Well, what is abortion?
What are the views on abortion? It’s going to give
you information on different sides
of an issue. Okay.
So, CQ Researcher I also love. It’s similar to
Opposing Viewpoints. But what it does that
I think is fantastic is it gives you more of
a complete overview of a topic. It gives you kind of
like a huge PDF file, so, on hot topics
like health care, international affairs,
the environment, the economy. And it gives you
background information, what’s going on right now. It does give you pro con. And it gives you kind
of bibliographies that you can follow up
with on key sources. So I think it’s
fantastic for that. Obviously, American
history online. We have to go back and look
at what happened in history and how that impacted
our government. And those, you may get
some questions on that. And then, EBSCO has a military
and government collection, which, again, may be
a focus of somebody asking a question
about the government. LexisNexis Academic is fantastic for what’s happening
right now in the news. And it also gives you
company profiles. For instance, if somebody
had a question about so and so funded Trump’s campaign. What is that company? You could look that up as well. Also, Statistical Abstract
of the United States and this is through ProQuest,
it used to be free. ProQuest bought it. And now, it’s, you know, you’ve got to pay for it
if you want it. There’s other ways
to find this information. But what this does it covers
political and economic life, which is really great. And, again, this may answer
some of the questions that your patrons have for that. So if I had unlimited money
in my library, these are the three —
there’s going to be some more I’m going to talk to you
about — but these are the three
I would buy if I had money. The first is the PAIS Index. And this is the public affair
information service index. And it indexes articles, books,
conference proceedings, government documents,
book chapters and statistical directories about public affairs. So it’s fantastic. You can search across it. My library doesn’t have it. But I know some of the college
libraries do have this. And so kind of a go-to
information for public affairs information. Another one is the worldwide
political science abstracts. And, again, this is public
administration and policy. This is something I used when
I was working on my doctorate. And it just gives you
information about various topics in political science. And again, that would be
a fantastic one if this is something
your college or your school focuses on, a little bit more in-depth
than say for a public library. My favorite of the three
probably is congressional publications because we have this
at our library. And what’s fantastic about it
is you can look up the congressional
record for the week and what’s happening
in congress. You can also find information
and biographies of different
congressional members. Yes, this information
is available for free in different spots, you know? But this pulls it all together. It also gives you
legislative history. So if you’re trying to trace
what happened with the law, it will do that for you. It’s also got
the Federal Register, so tons and tons of
government information about what’s kind of
going on in congress. And again, like I said,
I’m going to show you a couple things that are free. But this is — this is just
something if you had the money that would be
fantastic to purchase. But who has —
who has that, right? A couple other ones
that are useful that, again, would cost money are the American Foreign
Relations Since 1600. And so this is kind of more
about what’s happening with diplomacy
with the United States. And it starts from the colonial
era to the 21st century. So it’s just kind of if you have
somebody that has a question about the government
and foreign relations, it would be a great
place to go to. Another one is the
alternative press index. And this is information, you
know, because a lot of times, what we get is mainstream. This is more alternative,
radical and left periodicals. You know, the left has been in
the news quite a bit lately. And it just kind of
gives you information about different viewpoints. Not that necessary
it’s right or wrong, it’s just alternative views. And it indexes these types
of resources that are out there. It kind of gives you viewpoints on what those
people are thinking. Another one that’s interesting
is Europa World. And so this gives you
statistical data on economics, political and geographical
background on countries. And it’s impartial. It’s not, you know,
this is the viewpoint — it’s not biased
is what I’m saying. And it also gives you
a comprehensive listing of about 1,900
international organizations. Another one that a lot of people
have is HeinOnline. We had that at Sanford. And it gives you — again,
if you had a legal question, if you wanted reports
and opinions of the U.S. Attorney General. It’s also got
the Federal Register. It’s got formulations
of the Untied States, congressional documents and also
the Supreme Court Library. Again, there’s other ways to get
to this type of information for free. Another one that people are
interested in as far as politics is what did somebody
feel about this. How do people, you know,
like this — this issue. What do people want to know? It’s called the iPoll Databank. And I’ve got a free alternative I’ll talk to you
about in a minute. But just to let you know, there
is a subscription database. And what this does is it shows
you questions and answers for surveys asked in the U.S.
over the last 65 years by more than 150 survey
organizations. So that’s a huge data set. And so it’s just something
to think about. And then finally, I couldn’t
leave the subscription databases without talking about West Law. So if you have a court issue
that somebody is asking about, not a lot of libraries
have this. It’s quite expensive. You can, again, find this
in free resources. It just may take
a little bit more legwork. But again, this is law review
articles, statues, court rules, proposed and adopted regulation. And it also offers
legal analysis. Okay, so, I don’t have access to a lot of
the subscription databases. And obviously, I can’t get into
the Florida Electronic Library. So I can’t show you kind of
what they look like. But for the free stuff,
the government websites, the elections, the voting,
different things like that, I can actually show you
what they look like. So I’m just going to take
a minute and kind of discuss some of the sites
I’m going to show you. And again, don’t get
overwhelmed. Think about there ones —
think about the questions that you typically get and which of these sites
might be the most helpful. And then, I’m going to actually
kind of show you what they look like because it’s all fine
and good to talk about them without actually kind
of getting a picture of, okay, what does that site look like? Because you don’t always
have time to click on each and every one of these. You could, after this session,
if you want to, if you want to play around,
I would recommend that. But these are some
government websites. And these are all free. And again, you can gather
some of the information that we talked about that is
in the subscription databases. And if you’re like my library, we don’t have a ton
of extra money. Even though we’re the
federal government, we don’t have extra money. We might be able to buy one of
the 10, you know what I mean? So it’s great to be able
to have these resources that are free to get
the same type of information. But you have to make
yourself aware of them, you have to play with them,
those kinds of things. So as I mentioned in the
beginning, American FactFinder can be great for helping you get
information about different — especially if somebody’s looking
to start a small business, or if they’re looking to see, you know, what kind of people
are in their community. Because if there’s a lot
of poverty in your area, it would be good to know that
because then you could advocate different services for people. And you could help them be aware
of what government services are out there. Another website is called
American President. This is really kind of neat. This is from 1840
to the present. It’s got primary sources. It’s got public papers,
party platforms. And it’s got speeches,
audio and video. So if somebody wants to know
about a president, it’s pretty — really nice comprehensive source
about our presidents. There’s also the Biographical
Dictionary of the United States. And this, again, this is free. Like I said, you know,
some of this information was in a couple of the
for pay databases. But why pay for it
if it’s out there for free and it’s accurate? So this could give you
biographical sketches and the years in congress. And you can search by name,
position, state party, year or congressional session. So I think it’s great to have
a free site like that. Congress.gov, of course. And, again, this is where
you can find legislation. The congressional
record is here. You can find committee
information and committee reports. And, again,
you can find profiles of the members of congress. So, again, some of
the information that normally
you’d have to pay for is out there for free. I don’t know if you’ve ever
watched C-SPAN, but that’s available. You can visit
their video library to watch footage
of the house and senate. You can also visit their congressional
information center. And you can look up state
and local officials. So it’s kind of an interesting
site if you’ve never been there, if you’ve just seen it on T.V. The Federal Judicial Center, this is the research
agency for the courts. You can learn how
the court system works. You can read biographies
of federal judges. And you can also learn about
some of the more landmarked types of legislation. So you could look up things
like abortion if you had an abortion question,
that kind of thing. Government Attic is
kind of a fun site. It’s kind of things like,
I don’t know if you’ve heard about, like, the $5,000 hammer. But these are —
there’s more than that. But these are kind of, you know,
documents that are obtained under the Freedom
of Information Act. So it’s just a fun site.
You just go check it out. It’s got some documents
and things that you probably wouldn’t
find anywhere else. Of course, where would we be
without the Government Printing Office? That’s where we get mostly —
I think the latest statistic I saw was, like, 98 percent of federal documents
now come from — are now online on GPO. We don’t get a lot of them
in print anymore. And I don’t know if that’s
the same for you guys. But I can’t remember
the last time we got something for our government
documents collection in print. It’s also got current and
historical documents. So if you’re trying to search
for something, that could be a place to go. Speaking more towards literacy
of our patrons, government literacy, there’s a really good site
called “How Our Laws Are Made.” And whenever I see this,
I think about, you know, the after-school special,
“I’m Just a Bill.” That comes through my head. But this is something that
you can point your patrons to. It’s not overwhelming. It’s very simply stated
about how a law is made. And that could be important if somebody is
thinking about voting. Well, what does it mean
to make a law? What’s my role? How does it happen? Also, the Internet
Public Library has a really good kind of hub for law, government
and political science. And they aren’t updating
this anymore. But the links still work. And so that’s a great place
to go to kind of get a start on, you know, what sites might I use if I’m helping somebody
with a government question. This ICPSR, which is the
Inter-university Consortium for Political
and Social Research, this is a fantastic site. It may be a little bit
more than, say, what a public library needs. But it’s got about
7,500 research studies, and it’s got
500,000 files of data. So things like demographics,
crime, economics, education. It’s got information
on elections, health care, aging
and substance abuse. That’s just kind
of a hodgepodge. But it’s got a ton of
information. It’s a data archive. So it’s another place to go
to get some statistics. The National Criminal Justice
Reference Service, it’s got statistics about crime,
law enforcement drugs and other topics
related to criminal justice, because a lot of people,
for instance, are moving into a new community. And, of course, you could go
to your local sites for crime statistics. But if somebody is doing,
like, a paper on crime, and they want statistics, or if they’re looking
at law enforcement. Again, there’s some overlap
with government. Of course, the White House site. This gives you kind of the
current administration’s view, information about their family. It’s also got some great
information about the executive branch. It’s got links to different
departments and agencies. So, sometimes, you can find
a link to a specific agency that might be hard to find with
just Google, that kind of thing. You can start there instead. Okay. Sometimes, people want to know
about the supreme court. I can hardly ever say
this, Oyze, Oyez, I guess that’s how you say it. So this has abstracts about
constitutional law because some people, again, are researching the law, the constitution. And these are cases decided
by the Supreme Court. So, again, if you had somebody
who wanted to know about the landmark case
about abortion, where would they find that? So you could look at that —
that place. One of the things we talked
about in the beginning was the linkage,
you know, between librarians, between the people
and these different agencies. Well, one of the agencies that
impacts politics and policy and voting are lobbyists. And so, sometimes,
you’ll have questions about what a lobbyist group is, what lobbyist groups
support candidates. What do they —
what are they all about? What are their issues? So this is a link to about
500 different websites of United States lobbyists. So sometimes, you know,
if they support a candidate, and you’re thinking about
voting for that candidate, it might be a place
to go to look at what is that lobbying company —
what do they believe? What do they do? Also, the Supreme Court
database, and this is — has 200 pieces of information
about each case that’s been decided about, the court, between
1953 and 2008. So it’s got the identity
of the court whose decision
the Supreme Court reviewed. So sometimes, you don’t
always get that — the parties, legal provisions,
and then also, the votes of each
of the justices which is kind of interesting. USA Facts, so this is — and it’s a really
user-friendly site. It’s just got a Google-like
search flag. It’s fantastic. But this gives you federal,
state and local data from over
70 government resources. So, again, if somebody wanted
to know about crime, or they wanted to know
about poverty, it’s a great place to go. Also, usa.gov, if you’re
thinking about somebody who needs help with what
programs do they qualify for, those kinds of thing. This is the official site
of the U.S. government. There’s not much
you can’t do here. Again, a great site. The United States Code. I don’t know if you’ve
ever had anybody that was looking for this. I’ve had a couple
questions in my time. But this is great
because it lists all the current
federal laws and effect. It’s done by Cornell. And it’s arranged by title, so that broad areas
that the code covers. And it’s completely searchable. And, again, it’s free. The United States
Federal Judiciary. So this also talks, if you have
somebody that doesn’t know how the federal
judicial system works, you know, for instance, starts at the local level,
moves up to state. How does it become
a federal issue? And it gives you information
about each level of the court system,
the federal courts. You know, there’s like this
precinct and that precinct, and how does all that work? This site will help you
figure that out. Okay. And then finally, the United
States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. So sometimes, people want
to know what’s going on, what’s recent
and pending legislation in each of the houses and then also in the senate. What’s going on? And it also gives you
biography information. Again, this information
is freely available. A lot of this, again,
you would have to pay for if this wasn’t out there
on the Internet. So I think it’s fantastic. And then, there’s also
information about U.S. Supreme Court decisions
from 1990 to the present. And again, this is searchable. And then earlier, 1937 to ’75 is also searchable
by keyword or case name. And the finally, people want
to know about that question we get about government
spending. What does the Department
of Treasury do? It gives you a history
of the department. You can also take a fun,
virtual tour. But it just kind of gives you
information about what the treasury is looking at, how we spend our money,
those kinds of things. So just kind of a quick
look at what — okay, so that’s everything. I know it was overwhelming. Again, pick and choose
what speaks to you about these different topics and what you get the most. But I wanted to expose you
to some of the free things that normally you would think of paying for,
and you don’t have to. That information is out there. It’s just making yourself
aware of these websites and what they can do for you. Okay.
Off my soapbox. I just like to be able
to connect our patrons to free things and not be kind of, you know, spend our library on budget
on things for them that are really
going to help them when these things are
out there for free. So this is
the American FactFinder. And what’s great about this
is what you want to do is click on advanced search. And, for instance, here,
I wanted to know the education level
for Collier County, Florida. And it’s going to
give that to me. So in the beginning, when we’re
talking about thinking about what kind of
government services or outreach you might do for your library or what kind of things you might
provide in your collection. These different community
factors would help you kind of determine
a little bit better — give you a better picture of
what kind of government services or what kind of things you
might have in your collection to support who is existing
in your community. So this is
the American president. And, like I said,
this is kind of really neat, a really neat site. It’s got all the U.S.
Presidents, the speeches. It’s got some oral histories. It’s also got some
educational resources. And it’s also got just
some really, you know, it’s got some nice pictures. So it’s — again, if you have
a question about the presidency, it’s really —
a really nice site. This is the Biographical
Dictionary of United States. So, again, like I said, you an
look for a congressional member. You know, it’s just fabulous
because, again, it’s free. Congress.gov, again, there’s
a ton of information here. You can look at the current
legislative activities of congress, the house, the senate. You can also do a search, it’s kind of a Google-like
search for current legislation. You can also see the most-viewed
bills, which is kind of neat. Probably if your patron
is looking for it, it might be here in the top 10. So, again that’s the congress. C-SPAN we talked
a little bit about. Like I said, you can watch
this live here. Again, you can search
for information. The Federal Judicial Center,
like I said, this is kind of a way
to educate your users about the judicial
branch of government. Again, it’s got research about
the courts, education, history, judicial relations. It’s also got
a publications catalog. Government Attic, like I said,
this is kind of a fun site. It’s got FOIA information,
documents. To find those,
up here at the top, you’d actually click on
where it says “documents” right there. Hopefully, you can see my mouse. This is the government
printing office. Again, you can search it. You can get a catalog
of government publications. You can look up things. You can locate a
federal depository library. You can also look at Ben’s guide
to the U.S. government. He’s got a fantastic
list of websites and different things like that. Again, you can search it if you’re looking
for a publication. Again, this is where
I was telling you about how our laws are made. So this kind of gives you,
again, a different kind of very simple way
to explain to somebody how a law
is actually made. It takes you step-by-step. This is the Internet Public
Library I was mentioning. So again, this is just
kind of a hub on giving you
some different websites, kind of like
what I’m doing today. It gives you — Okay,
I’ll come back to your question. Great. So, again, this is
the Internet Public Library. Again, it’s got some things. This is something
that was done librarians, evaluated by librarians. And so, you can get information
about elections, political advocacy groups, political parties,
different things like that. So again, it’s just kind of
a hub to help you get started. This is the ICPSR, like I said, it might be a little bit
over public library level. But it may still be useful. Again, it’s got 500 data
sets in here. So you can search for things
like census information, community and urban studies. What you can’t see
on the screen, there’s about 10 more places
you can look at. Economics, behavior
and attitudes, those are all things
that might be helpful to you. Again, here’s the office of the
President of the United States, which is the White House,
the Supreme Court Resource. So, again,
you can look at cases. You can look at the justices. This is where I was telling you about the
political advocacy groups. So if you wanted to know about
different types of lobbying and what they do and how they might influence
a particular candidate, this would be a great source. Again, the Supreme
Court database. You can find information
about — yeah, the Internet Public Library
hasn’t been updated. You’re correct. But a lot of the sites
still work. So sometimes, I go there
if I’m struggling to find, you know,
kind of an overview site. So a lot of the sites still work
even though it hasn’t been actually added to and updated
if that makes sense. So I still mention it. But great point, Amy. Thank you. So this is the
Supreme Court database. Again, it’s got data. It’s got analysis. So, again, if somebody’s looking
at a site, it might be helpful. USA Facts, this is where
I was telling you it kind of has like a Google form
where you can search. So it’s got federal,
state and local data from 70 government sources. You know, for instance,
where does the money come from? Where does the money go? Those are questions you
can answer with this site. Again, this is the site
for the government. So if you get
that question about, “What services
do I qualify for?”, again, you can look
at government agencies. You can look at benefits,
grants and loans, housing, jobs and unemployment. So, again, this would
definitely help you answer those questions about, “What government services
do I qualify for?” This is, again,
the United States Code, should you need to search it, the United States
Federal Judiciary. Again, you can
find a courthouse. You can look at judges. You can find out
what information about federal courts. The House of Representatives,
pretty self-explanatory. We’ve looked at that. The Senate is here. The Supreme Court’s decisions
from 1990 to the present, this is what this looks like
and then also earlier, from 1937 to 1975. So you may have people that are
looking at court cases, and I just mention
that just in case you do, and again, this is free. You don’t have to go to Westlaw. And then how is our money spent? So this, you know, treasury,
and it’s got it for different people,
the public, businesses, financial
institutions, government, so you can choose
how you look at it. Okay. So very quickly, I know somebody
mentioned something about elections and voting, so we’ll move
through this quickly. So as far as how do you
find out what’s true? I mean, we’ve got all this
fake news going around. We’ve got…
It bleeds over into elections and who does what
and what’s true and what’s not. So one of the things
that I like to look at is there’s this place
called factcheck.org. Has anybody ever used that?
So what it does… It’s impartial,
and it provides factual, up-to-date information on
all major political players, including presidential
candidates, so it’s a place you can go to. Now, you know, of course
as librarians we always want to double-check everything, but it’s a good start. It’s a start, and it will help
you look at different issues. Now somebody said,
“What about local elections?” The Florida Division
of Elections, this is kind of
the one-stop shop for voter information
in Florida. If you’re looking at finding
information, sometimes, people want to know
about women and women voting and different things like that. There’s the League
of Women Voters. Also, if you’re trying to look
at the money in U.S. elections, this site looks at the money. It’s called opensecrets.org. Again, if you’re trying
to educate yourself or your patrons about, you know, how does the money
flow in different elections, local, state, national? And this is created by the
Center for Responsive Politics, and so this is kind of
a political watch-dog group. Again, I don’t trust everything
as I get it as a librarian, and you probably do this, too. You definitely evaluate,
but these are places that are starting to do that, and it can help your users
if they want to check a fact or if they want
to check the money in different candidates
and elections, so I really like that. Again, remember, earlier,
we talked about that poll site that was a subscription. The pollster.com is free, and it covers many
different types of polls, governor, congressional,
presidential. There’s a site called
Project Vote Smart, which I really like as well. What this does is
it’s nonpartisan, so it kind of, again, it helps us to help our patrons become more literate
about government and politics. It provides biographical
information and voting records for elected officials
and candidates. So again, if you’re thinking in
terms of your local elections, this may be a site to go to. And then, you know, just basic
information in general about how do I vote, what are elections,
what does all this mean? This is, again, through usa.gov, but this contains official
information about voting in the U.S. It can tell you how to contact
your local elected officials, so if you fee strongly about
an issue, who is your person? Who is your representative? Who is your
congressional member? And it also gives you
information about the Electoral College and how that works and also how
to find voter registration. So this is kind of what
these sites look like, just to give you
a quick overview. So this is information. This is factcheck.org. And so, you know, it’s not…
It’s impartial. So it, right here,
it’s obviously saying that Trump didn’t get it right
about nuclear weapons boast. There’s a question over here,
“Did NASA confirm that there will be 15 days of
darkness on Earth in November?” So, you know, it’s kind of like
if you’ve ever used Snopes, but it’s more about
checking facts, and it has a lot
of political information. This is, of course,
what is huge for your guys, which is the Florida
Division of Elections. So they can check to see,
can I vote? First of all, you know,
have you registered to vote? Is it still good? You know, those kinds of things. You can check your
polling place, the election dates, if there’s
any special elections, so this may be helpful. Hopefully, you guys
find this helpful for the upcoming elections. This is something you can
definitely go ahead and send to your patrons
if they should ask. League of Women voters, again,
if you’re looking for this particular
type of information, that may be helpful, you know,
looking at women as a focus. Some patrons have those
kinds of patrons. Opensecrets.org, again,
like I said, this is, you know, very good site
to kind of educate yourselves about, for instance,
the Trump administration. You can look up information
on nonprofits, Congress, congressional committees. It’s got information
on influence and lobbying, expenditures, political ads. It’s got news and analysis,
so again, it just kind of helps you ask those questions that you can’t really
find in Google. You know, it’s kind of gathered
information, supposed to be impartial. Again, you want to
check your facts, but it’s a good start
for kind of informing yourself about the issues, what’s true, what’s not true,
where does the money come from, those kinds of things
that might be important to you choosing a candidate. Here’s pollster.com. Like I said, you know,
there’s a lot of… There’s Gallup,
which you have to pay for. There’s the other site
we mentioned earlier, iPoll, that you have to pay for. This is absolutely free,
so it’s got some different polls that might be helpful to
answer question for your patron. Project Vote Smart: So again,
this is a site that talks about, you know, kind of
verifying your facts, looking at biographies,
how people voted, their position, so again, it kind of helps you
become more literate about the candidates
and the issues. Voting in elections, again,
this is not on the local level but just kind of more abroad, and I really like the first
topic here that says, “Decide who to vote for,” because I think that’s so hard
to explain to people, and it gives you… You know, how do you
make informed choices? What does a ballot look like? How do you research candidates? So I think that’s kind of
a fantastic site, you know, find my state or local
election website, how to vote,
different things like that. Okay. So very quickly, I’m sure
you could google this, but I just wanted to show you
where you could find all the different parties
at the local level as well, so this is just websites on how you find your
local political parties. So the Democratic Party, it’s got information
about the history. You know, of course,
it’s very flashy. It’s very pro-Democrat just like
all the other sites are very pro whatever their position is, but I also wanted you
to be aware that there’s a Florida website, and again, it’s going to have
a calendar of upcoming events, state elections
and different things like that. It would have information
on candidates that are running
for election in Florida, same thing for
the Republican Party. There’s a website
for the Libertarian Party, the Green Party,
the Communist Party. There’s actually a Communist
Party US website, believe it or not. The Socialist Party
and the Tea Party. So sometimes, it’s just…
You know, you could google this, but if you had a list somewhere, you could just copy and paste it and send it to the patron,
you know, information about
the different political parties and what they believe. So just real quickly,
this is what kind of the Democratic Party website
looks like. This is for Florida,
and again, you can sign up. You can donate. You can find out who the party
is and their team for Florida. This is the Republican Party,
and again, it’s got a little bit
more information here under their menu about the
platform, state leadership, different things like that. So this is for Florida. Again, you can sign up. You can donate. Most political websites
have those options. You can get involved. You can find a local, again,
a local GOP, so again, some different information. So this is the website
on the Libertarian Party, the Green Party, the Communist Party,
like I said, for the US so very different, the Socialist Party
and then the Tea Party. So just, you know, I know
that you guys know those sites are out there, but sometimes, it’s good
to just have them all together, one spot, you know, copy and paste or click
on for your patrons. So just finally, to look at
a couple different things, you know, we wouldn’t be
where we are today without some of
our founding documents, and one of them, of course,
is the Constitution, the Federalist Papers,
different things like that, so I just wanted to give you
that information in case you get
a question about, what does the Constitution
say about X? The National Constitution Center
will let you search throughout the Constitution
for specific passages and also not just,
you know, finding the words but also explanations, so there’s a little button
that says, “Explore the Constitution,” and you can also search
for topics like civil rights or gun control because people want to know,
“Well, what does the law say? What does the Constitution say?” So this would be super helpful
for those kinds of questions. The next site site is
the Federalist Papers. This is from Thomas from
the Library of Congress, and this has access to the 85
essays that urged New Yorkers to ratify the proposed
Constitution, so sometimes, that can be
helpful information. Also from the Library
of Congress is the Continental Congress and Constitutional
Convention Broadsides, and these are 274 documents
related to Congress and the drafting
and ratification of the Constitution, so again, if somebody is doing research
or study on the Constitution and how it impacts laws
or different things like that or what it means for today,
what it means for elections, whatever policy, this may
be something to look at. The Charters of Freedom actually
has those primary documents like the Declaration
of Independence, the Constitution,
the Bill of Rights, so it’s just kind of a website
that’s free that lists a lot of
those founding documents. So this is the National
Constitution Center, and so again,
read the Constitution. Learn. You can actually, again,
search through the Constitution and get explanations. You can also buy a ticket
for a tour. Again, the Federalist Papers, these are the essential original
texts of the Federalist Papers, and again, you can
look through those. The Continental Congress
and Constitutional Convention Broadsides,
those are here as well, and it’s actually the image,
the primary source. The Charters of Freedom, again,
the Declaration of Independence is here, the Constitution,
the Bill of Rights. There’s a few more documents
here, and it’s, you know, the actual primary source.
Okay. So just very quickly,
I know that, sometimes, you’re looking for free
government and politics books, or you’re looking for free
government and politics article, so I just want to give you
a couple sources if you’re a library that
doesn’t have a lot of funding. And, with a lot of these,
it can be hit or miss. It’s just whatever somebody
was able to put there for free, so sometimes, you’ll get great
stuff, sometimes, not so much, but it is a place
you can look at and again, get some information that
might help your patrons if you don’t have
a robust collection or your funding
like a lot of us don’t. My library doesn’t,
so sometimes, these are sources
that can help you get information
for your patrons, so there’s the Directory
of Open Access Books, and this is a link to finding
books on political science. Through the University
of Pennsylvania, there’s an online books page. It’s got about
a million free books. I’m going to take you
very quickly through a Google Books
Advanced Search. I don’t know if you knew
there was an advanced search. Again, a lot of it’s not free, but there may be
something there. HathiTrust, again, this is more
of a repository of items that were digitized via
Google Books, Internet Archive, different things like that. Again, only public domain
is full-text searchable. Finally, the Internet Archive,
again, that has books,
movies and music and 281 billion
archived Web pages. There is a health-care politics. There is a site. Oh, shoot, I mentioned
that in my… Can I get back
to you on that one? I know there’s… Oh, shoot, I can picture
the name in my head. I will get back with you
after we’re done, but there are a couple
in my health-care one, which should be
on the SWFLN page. There’s a bunch of resources
that will give you data, statistics, issues
on health care, and it was free, and it was
kind of a watch-dog site. I’ll get back to you. Don’t let me forget. Okay. So these are… Again, this is just kind of
screenshots of what you would do if you’re looking for books
on political science, so here, you would
click on browse, and you can do browse
by subject. There’s a subject area called
law and political science, and under that is
political science, so again, there’s
free books here, just hit or miss depending on
what you’re looking for. You can also search throughout as opposed to
doing it by subject. This is through the University
of Pennsylvania. These are all the
online books page for public political science, and you can actually click on
any of these narrower terms, but again, it gives you
the free books here. This is Google
Advanced Book Search, and what you can do is you
can type in your subject area. You can make it a little
bit more specific, and then one of the things
to look at here where it says, “Search all books, limited
preview and full view, full view only,
Google e-books only,” if you want a book
that’s full text, you have to select
full view only. If you’re just looking for all
books that might be mentioned, you can do all books, but if you’re looking
for a full-text book, you want full view only. Happy Trust, again, you can
search for political science, this pretty simple. This is the Internet Archive, which I don’t know
if you’re aware, but it also has more
than just videos and movies. I just did a search
for political science, and again, there’s
a couple things here. Just, again, it just depends
on what you’re looking for. Okay. So if you’re looking
for free government and politics articles, there’s a couple of sites
that might be helpful for you. There’s directory
of open-access journals. Again, this is similar
to the book search. They also do magazine articles. Click on political science. Again, you can also search it. Google Scholar, I just
want to show you how it’s a little bit different, and you can actually select
your library to search. Sometimes, it’s a different
interface and algorithm that will help you find things that you didn’t necessarily find
in your discovery service, but it will also pull
in other libraries. And also OAIster,
I’m probably saying that wrong. This has some open archive
collections worldwide, and I just want to show
you that very quickly. So for Directory of Open-access
Journals and political science, again, you can
browse by subject, or you can simply search,
and so again, it depends on what type
of topic you’re looking for, but if you look here
on the left-hand side, I’ve selected the subject
of political science. You can be a little bit
more specific, for instance, if you want
international relations, different things like that, but you’ll see the whole
article is actually there. The Directory of Open-access
Journals and books, they are putting things there. It’s just moving very
slowly, obviously, because of copyright
and different things like that, but I provide it as an option because it may be something where you’d find
a book for free, an article for free that your
library doesn’t subscribe to. So Google Scholar, I just want
to show you very quickly. When you go into Google Scholar, up in the right-hand corner,
there’s a little gear icon, and when you click on that,
you can actually click on what’s called Library Links. And so you can actually
have it search your library, but you can also pick
to have it search what you think of as
libraries that would have, you know, like,
huge collections in government
or political science. So what I did…
You can choose up to five. What I did is it selects
roll cap by default, but for instance, I selected The London School of Economics
and Political Science, Shanghai University
of Political Science, Brevard College, Eastern Florida State College, but again, you can
actually type and search, and it will pull up
the different libraries, and you can just select them. Once you do this,
you’re going to click on save, and then, on the next screen… I went too far.
Sorry. On the next screen, you can
actually do your search, and if it comes up
in your library, it’ll show you over here
on the far right-hand side where it says
Brevard e-journals, but also, it’ll pull
up other libraries. So for instance,
here’s a PDF at osu.edu, so what I did
is I did a search on Florida State
legislature and democracy, just very general,
not a very good search. I just trying to demonstrate
there’s things here, but you can actually get
some of the full text for things that you wouldn’t
normally discover, you know, searching for Google, and then, also,
it includes things that might be at
your library as well, so I, you know, show you that as a way to kind
of find some articles or books that might be helpful
for your patrons. And last but not
least is OAIster. One of the things that’s very
important you can search, this is through,
of course, through OCLC, and you can search. One of the things
to be careful of, and here, I just searched
for legislature. Over here on the right-hand side where it says format
as you scroll down, and you’ll see I’ve circled. If you want to get
the full text, if you want them
to be full text, you have to select
downloadable article. Otherwise, it gives you
everything, and you don’t get the full text. So again, this can
be hit or miss because people have
put things here for free, but again, you may find
something useful for your patrons. Okay. So as I said earlier,
you know, part of this is the reference interview. Part of this is, you know,
being able to search efficiently and just having
background knowledge and some of the resources that might help you
help your patrons. And how are you
going to provide this? Are you going to have,
you know, on your desktop, a politics cheat sheet, just word with websites,
real simple, a Web… You know, you put these
sites in your catalog. Are you going to maybe
make a LibGuide? Whatever it is, a handout,
you know, have a strategy that will help you
help your patrons. So you can become effective
and hopefully focusing
on the reference interview, whether it’s in digital chat
or in person, you know, having those technical
and communication skills and now kind of having probably an overwhelmingly
amount of resources on politics and government,
you can become effective, and you an make
your patrons happy and get them the
information that they need. I absolutely believe that. So this is your homework
should you choose to accept it. Like I said, when I come
and teach digital reference in person for Luly, one of the things I do is I cut
all these into strips of paper. I pair people up. They have to get in a chat room, and they don’t know
the question, and some person
plays the librarian. Some person plays the patron,
and you just interact, you know, with these questions. You could do the same
thing in person, but just practice on these
different types of questions, and you may have even more
that you guys get all the time that would be fun
to just kind of go over in an hour
with all of your staff, all your reference staff. You know, hey,
here are some sites. Here is how you’d answer
this question just kind of on politics or whatever topic, you know, you get
a lot of questions on. How would you find sources
on these local candidates? You’re probably going
to get that right now? What site would you go to? How would you answer
that question? So hopefully, I’ve answered
that for you, and again, you can play
with these questions. These are just some
sample questions. Some of them are great. Some of them are not so great,
but I was just trying to get you some questions that you could practice with. So do you have any questions? Thanks very much,
and I’m probably saying your name wrong, Narges. I’m sorry if I’m
saying that wrong. Can I e-mail that to you,
or would everybody like to get the e-mail for the health-care one? I believe it’s on the SWFLN
website, but I can… Okay.
Great. Great. Oh, and, actually,
this presentation, you will get e-mailed to you… I believe Taylor,
Luly will speak up about that. This you will definitely
get e-mailed to you. I was just also asking about
if you would like the link to the health-care one. Okay. If there are no more questions, I really thank you
for your time, and this was kind of a sprint to kind of go over
some of the sources, but if you’re like me, I don’t
always have a lot of time to kind of sit down and think, “Gosh. What sites
would I go to?” You know, it’s kind of,
like, in the moment, and so if you have this kind of
in your back pocket, you’ve got some starting points, however you might decide
to arrange your sites. And again,
pick what speaks to you. Pick what’s going to be
most useful for your patrons, that’s going to help answer the
questions you get all the time. Thanks very much,
and if there’s nothing else, I think Taylor or Luly
is going to speak up, and they probably have
a survey for you or something fun like that. Castro: Yes, we do. We’ll be sending out the slides
and the survey momentarily. Thank you, Dr. Rollins,
for a wonderful webinar. Some information and a
sneak peek of what is coming up: Attendees, if you enjoy
this webinar, please join us Tuesday, September 26th,
for “DigiRef Academy: Reference Service for Patrons
with Disabilities.” We encourage you to look
at the upcoming webinars and workshops in months ahead and hope you are
all able to join us for the future
training opportunities. As always, please feel free to
keep checking your CE calendar on our website, our Facebook page or your
message from the SWFLN LISTSERV. Thank you, everyone,
for attending, and have a terrific rest
of your week. Rollins: Thanks, everybody.
Goodbye. Have a good day.

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